satire


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The result, Lindvall contends, is often a truncated satire, a secular ridicule wanting the normative foundations needed for cultural renewal.
As a type of entertainment-oriented political content that aims to criticize politics and reveal violations of social norms in an implicit and playful way, political satire has drawn scholarly attention in terms of whether it could play a significant role in facilitating a more engaged public.
I'm doing a different show now in the United States, using satire in a different country, different language, different context.
The pressure of keeping the audience happy often turns satire into slapstick, and that is where the purpose can get defeated," says Nila Madhab Panda, whose new film Kaun Kitney Paani Mein , a satire on water crisis in droughtaffected Orissa, opened to decent collections last week, given its tight budget.
We look forward to working with companies who've expressed an interest in the Satire technology along with introducing it to those who aren't as familiar with it," added Bertram.
Satire has a civilising function, in that it not only makes others laugh at us, but causes us to examine our own motives.
Facebook will be posting articles from satire sites with headlines like, for example,"[Satire] FDA Recommends At Least 3 Servings Of Foods With Word 'Fruit' On Box.
Just as laughter is not the preserve of the West, neither is satire, and this collection of journal articles--from two special issues of Popular Communication (volume 10, issues 1-2)--seeks to broaden the burgeoning field of political satire and parody research.
Their standard operating procedure includes selecting random statements of famous politicians and twisting them to make fake news stories that read like serious news but have an inherent element of satire.
Admittedly, crimes against women have recently increased in India but this is the most ugly and stinking way to point out such a phenomenon," he said, adding that the website concerned was well advised to refrain from making such uncouth remarks in the name of satire.
The Practice of Satire in England, 1658-1770 by Ashley Marshall.
Mohamed Fathy, writer with Al Watan Newspaper, Egypt, said satire must be a means rather than an end.