scare


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References in periodicals archive ?
Fancy joining the scares at Lightwater Valley's Halloween Scare Fest?
SCARE FACTOR: You won't have anyone to recap with after .
But he failed to justify the LNPs scare campaign and its irresponsible claims that members benefits are at risk.
Andy and Jacqueline just entered the horror maze but people in costumes were already jumping out to scare them.
This is all fine when you are watching TV or on the internet and you are subject to scare tactics.
Emma Lloyd, Sefton Arts Programme and Marketing Manager, says: "We hope that Scare Fest 2 encourages children of all ages to get involved with reading and to see how much fun they can have in doing so.
There is nothing wrong with avoiding some thing that will scare you.
If persistent danger reinforces these casual scares over time with more casual scares, the bucks will eventually stop using a certain area or become nocturnal.
The data also shows that pork cutout has recovered a bit lately from the worst of the H1N1 scare.
They also address non-food scares concerning ritualized child sexual abuse, the dangers of driving too fast, lead in automobile fuel, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and global warming ("the most destructive scare of them all").
A scientist got the ball rolling (see right), but it was only when Currie, then a junior health minister, uttered the 20 words "We do warn people now that most of the egg production in this country is now, sadly, infected with salmonella" on ITN news that Britain's first major food scare really escalated.
British Airways said on Wednesday poor markings at Miami Airport were to blame for a safety scare involving a jumbo jet carrying British Prime Minister Tony Blair.