scold


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See: castigate, condemn, denounce, disapprove, fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate, reprehend, reprimand, reproach

SCOLD. A woman who by her habit of scolding becomes a nuisance to the neighborhood, is called a common scold. Vide Common Scold.

References in classic literature ?
We wonder how such saints can sing, Or praise the Lord upon the wing, Who roar, and scold, and whip, and sting, And to their slaves and mammon cling, In guilty conscience union.
Bessie, you must promise not to scold me any more till I go.
On his return he asked the parrot what had happened during his absence, and the parrot told him some things which made him scold his wife.
And I just as much," said the landlady, "because I never have a quiet moment in my house except when you are listening to some one reading; for then you are so taken up that for the time being you forget to scold.
Come in, my braves," said the king, "come in; I am going to scold you.
As for Andrea, he began, by way of showing off, to scold his groom, who, instead of bringing the tilbury to the steps of the house, had taken it to the outer door, thus giving him the trouble of walking thirty steps to reach it.
Pray do not scold her," replied Ulysses; "she is not to blame.
The colonel, perchance to relieve his feelings, began to scold like a wet parrot.
Suppose it to be NECESSARY, for FORM'S sake, to scold, and to set everyone right, and to shower around abuse (for, between ourselves, Barbara, our friend cannot get on WITHOUT abuse--so much so that every one humours him, and does things behind his back)?
Poyser, who professed to despise all personal attractions and intended to be the severest of mentors, continually gazed at Hetty's charms by the sly, fascinated in spite of herself; and after administering such a scolding as naturally flowed from her anxiety to do well by her husband's niece--who had no mother of her own to scold her, poor thing
What would the countess have done had she not been able sometimes to scold the invalid for not strictly obeying the doctor's orders?
It has never been my way to scold or chide thee, yet always hath my heart ached for each crime laid at the door of Norman of Torn.