SEA

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SEA

abbreviation for SINGLE EUROPEAN ACT.

SEA. The ocean; the great mass of waters which surrounds the land, and which probably extends from pole to pole, covering nearly three quarters of the globe. Waters within the ebb and flow of the tide, are to be considered the sea. Gilp. R. 526.
     2. The sea is public and common to all people, and every person has an equal right to navigate it, or to fish there; Ang. on Tide Wat. 44 to 49; Dane's Abr. c. 68, a. 3, 4; Inst. 2, 1, 1; and to land upon the sea, shore. (q.v.)
     3. Every nation has jurisdiction to the distance of a cannon shot, (q, v.) or marine league, over the water adjacent to its shore. 2 Cranch, 187, 234; 1 Circuit Rep. 62; Bynk. Qu. Pub. Juris. 61; 1 Azuni Mar. Law, 204; Id. 185; Vattel, 207:

References in periodicals archive ?
The rise in sea levels is accelerating at an increasing rate annually that could cause it to be nearly two feet higher in the years to come, according to the findings of (http://www.
Of the 3 inches of sea level rise in the past quarter century, about 55 percent is from warmer water expanding, and the rest is from melting ice.
SEA levels are increasing at an accelerating rate that could see them rising by a whole centimetre per year by 2100, research has shown.
The two major causes of the global sea level rise are thermal expansion caused by warming of the ocean (since water expands as it warms) and increased melting of land-based ice, such as glaciers and ice sheets.
Velicogna and Chia-Wei Hsu a graduate student at UCI, determined the sea level fingerprints by looking at time-variable gravity data collected by NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites from 2002 to 2014.
But the greatest climate bogie in the alarmist arsenal is sea level rise.
Maul and Hanson (1988) found that the average increase in sea level in the VRSNP from 1953 to 1985 was 1.
The event will bring together more than 300 scientists, city planners, coastal zone developers and other stakeholders from 37 countries to discuss the consequences of climate change on sea level rise, which presents a major threat to coastal communities worldwide.
They discovered that sea levels had risen relatively slowly -- by about 1.
The administration and partner organizations developed scenarios to help coastal communities prepare for the risks of increasing sea levels, which are driven by climate change.
92 at sea level, and back to the airport at 1000-foot elevation.