Seaman

(redirected from seadog)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

SEAMAN. A sailor; a mariner; one whose business is navigation. 2 Boulay Paty, Dr. Com. 232; Code de Commerce art. 262; Laws of Oleron, art. 7; Laws of Wishuy, art. 19. The term seamen, in it most enlarged sense, includes the captain a well as other persons of the crew; in a more confined signification, it extends only to the common sailors; 3 Pardes. n. 667; the mate; 1 Pet. Adm. Dee. 246; the cook and steward; 2 Id. 268; are considered, as to their rights to sue in the admiralty, as common seamen; and persons employed on board of steamboats and lighters, engaged in trade or commerce, on tide water, are within the admiralty jurisdiction, while those employed in ferry boats are not. Gilp. R. 203, 532. Persons who do not contribute their aid in navigating the vessel or to its preservation in the course of their occupation, as musicians, are not to be considered as seamen with a right to sue in the admiralty for their wages. Gilp. R. 516, See 1 Bell's Com. 509, 5th ed.; 2 Rob. Adm. R. 232; Dunl. Adm. Pr. h.t.
     2. Seamen are employed either in merchant vessels for private service, or in public vessels for the service of the United States.
     3.-1. Seamen in the merchant vessels are required to enter into a contract in writing commonly called shipping articles. (q.v.) This contract being entered into, they are bound under. severe penalties, to render themselves on board the vessel according to the agreement: they are not at liberty to leave the ship without the consent of the captain or commanding officer, and for such absence, when less than forty-eight hours, they forfeit three day's wages for every day of absence; and when the absence is more than forty-eight hours, at one time, they forfeit all the wages due to them, and all their goods and chattels which were on board the vessel, or in any store where they may have been lodged at the time of their desertion, to the use of the owners of the vessel, and they are liable for damages for hiring other hands. They may be imprisoned for desertion until the ship is ready to bail.
     4. On board, a seaman is bound to do his duty to the utmost of his ability; and when his services are required for extraordinary exertions, either in consequence of the death of other seamen, Or on account of unforeseen perils, he is not entitled to an increase of wages, although it may have been promised to him. 2 Campb. 317; Peake's N. P. Rep. 72; 1 T. R. 73. For disobedience of orders he may be imprisoned or punished with stripes, but the correction (q.v.) must be reasonable; 4 Mason, 508; Bee, 161; 2 Day, 294; 1 Wash. C. C. R. 316; and, for just cause, may be put ashore in a foreign country. 1 Pet. Adm. R. 186; 2 Ibid. 268; 2 East, Rep. 145. By act of Congress, September 28, 1850, Minot's Stat. at Large, U. S. p. 515, it is provided, that flogging in the navy and on board vessels of commerce, be, and the same is hereby abolished from and after the passage of this act.
     5. Seamen are entitled to their wages, of which one-third is due at every port at which the vessel shall unlade and deliver her cargo, before the voyage be ended; and at the end of the voyage an easy and speedy remedy is given them to recover all unpaid wages. When taken sick a seaman is entitled to medical advice and aid at the expense of the ship: such expense being considered in, the nature of additional wages, and as constituting a just remuneration for his labor and services. Gilp. 435, 447; 2 Mason, 541; 2 Mass. R. 541.
     6. The right of seamen to wages is founded not in the shipping articles, but in the services performed; Bee, 395; and to recover such wages the seaman has a triple remedy, against the vessel, the owner, and the master. Gilp. 592; Bee, 254.
     7. When destitute in foreign ports, American consuls and commercial agents are required to provide for them, and for their passages to some port of the United States, in a reasonable manner, at the expense of the United States; and American vessels are bound to take such seamen on board at the request of the consul, but not exceeding two men for every hundred tons of the ship, and transport them to the United States, on such terms, not exceeding ten dollars for each person, as may be agreed on. Vide, generally, Story's Laws U. S. Index, h.t.; 3 Kent, Com, 136 to 156; Marsh. Ins. 90; Poth. Mar. Contr. translated by Cushing, Index, h.t.; 2 Bro. Civ. and Adm. Law, 155.
     8.-2. Seamen in the public service are governed by particular laws.

References in periodicals archive ?
The rhythm and simple rhyme of Seadog invite repeated readings.
Seadog is a very delightful picture book, an excellent read-aloud for young audiences, perhaps even a read-along book with its jaunty rhythmic text.
Considering that 40 to 50 percent of operating costs in the desalination process are attributed to energy usage, the SEADOG Pump system provides significant cost savings and minimal environmental impact when compared to the large-scale use of power generated by fossil fuels.
The Southeastern airports learned quite a few lessons that were helpful from last year's Hurricane Ivan and those lessons were vital in organizing and launching SEADOG," Graham said.
The TUC leader, daughter of car and shop workers, couldn't think of anybody since old seadog John Prescott.
Call 029 2064 6901 2 The Sea Show A mix of puppet show, natural history and comedy cabaret featuring crazy characters like Morwenna the "beautiful" mermaid, Ruan the reformed seagull and salty seadog Captain Pemburthy.
s (INRI(TM)) SEADOG Pump system, researchers from the Texas A&M University at Galveston Marine Engineering Technology Department released a report today validating the performance and output of the innovative yet simple technology.
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: AT WORLD'S END (12) The third voyage of Captain Jack Sparrow opens with the salty seadog consigned to purgatory in Davy Jones' locker.
TODAY Shiver your timbers at Dover Castle in Kent where wannabe buccaneers can taste the life of a salty seadog with hair-raising tales of the high seas.
At least no one recognises me as Boycie when I am dressed like an old seadog.
With the idyllic undersea kingdom of Pepperland invaded by the Blue Meanies, salty seadog Old Fred arrives in Liverpool in his yellow submarine seeking help.
My grandad, born in 1890 was an old seadog, and when he died was a night watchman on the docks.