SEA

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SEA

abbreviation for SINGLE EUROPEAN ACT.

SEA. The ocean; the great mass of waters which surrounds the land, and which probably extends from pole to pole, covering nearly three quarters of the globe. Waters within the ebb and flow of the tide, are to be considered the sea. Gilp. R. 526.
     2. The sea is public and common to all people, and every person has an equal right to navigate it, or to fish there; Ang. on Tide Wat. 44 to 49; Dane's Abr. c. 68, a. 3, 4; Inst. 2, 1, 1; and to land upon the sea, shore. (q.v.)
     3. Every nation has jurisdiction to the distance of a cannon shot, (q, v.) or marine league, over the water adjacent to its shore. 2 Cranch, 187, 234; 1 Circuit Rep. 62; Bynk. Qu. Pub. Juris. 61; 1 Azuni Mar. Law, 204; Id. 185; Vattel, 207:

References in classic literature ?
Thus the Puritan elders in their black cloaks, starched bands, and steeple-crowned hats, smiled not unbenignantly at the clamour and rude deportment of these jolly seafaring men; and it excited neither surprise nor animadversion when so reputable a citizen as old Roger Chillingworth, the physician, was seen to enter the market-place in close and familiar talk with the commander of the questionable vessel.
But though I was so terrified by the idea of the seafaring man with one leg, I was far less afraid of the captain himself than anybody else who knew him.
Then he went on to talk about Neptune, where seafaring men get a jovial reception, and Mars, where the military get the best of the sidewalk to such an extent that folks can hardly stand it.
Hector said that pirates and other seafaring people generally lashed the rudder to something or other, and hauled in the main top-jib, during severe squalls, and thought we ought to try to do something of the kind; but I was for letting her have her head to the wind.
at which words the ship which Katharine had been considering seemed to put into harbor and have done with its seafaring.
But we remembered the seafaring bowmen of the days of our glory--it is the memory of these which we hurl upon our enemies.
In neither instance would it have been of a seafaring race.
The product was always the same, one hundred dollars, and he decided that that was better than seafaring.
He became the slave of old Fanfoa, head chief over a score of scattered bush-villages on the range-lips of Malaita, the smoke of which, on calm mornings, is about the only evidence the seafaring white men have of the teeming interior population.
The seafaring folk of Antioch had seen us breaking out topsail and staysail, a most reckless performance in such weather, and had hurried to the wharf-ends in little groups to find out what was the matter.
He had taken up seafaring through no love of it, but because it had been his destiny, because he had been the second son of his father instead of the first.
The man was a far-away Scots cousin of my late wife, who bore the honorable name of Bruce, and followed a seafaring life.