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Related to secessions: secessionist, secessionism, seceding


The act of withdrawing from membership in a group.

Secession occurs when persons in a country or state declare their independence from the ruling government. When a dissatisfied group secedes, it creates its own form of government in place of the former ruling government. Secessions are serious maneuvers that lead to, or arise from, military conflict.

A secession can affect international relationships as well as the civil peace of the nation from which a group secedes. Most countries consider secession by a town, city, province, or other body to be a criminal offense that warrants retaliation using force. Because the primary mission of most governments is to maximize the comfort and wealth of its citizens, nations jealously guard the land and wealth that they have amassed. In rare cases a government may recognize the independence of a seceding state. This recognition may occur when other countries support the independence of the seceding state. However, for most countries, the involuntary loss of land and wealth is unthinkable.

Most countries have laws that punish persons who secede or attempt to secede. The United States has no specific law on secession, but the federal government and state governments maintain laws that punish Sedition and other forms of insurrection against the government. On the federal level, for example, chapter 115 of title 18 of the U.S. Code Annotated identifies Treason, rebellion, or insurrection, seditious conspiracy, and advocation of the overthrow of the government as criminal offenses punishable by several years of imprisonment and thousands of dollars in fines. These are the types of crimes that can be charged against persons who attempt to secede from the United States.

The U.S. Civil War was the result of the single most ambitious secession in the history of the United States. In February 1861 South Carolina seceded from the Union, and Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, and Tennessee followed suit shortly thereafter. These states seceded because they objected to attempts by the federal government to abolish the enslavement of black people. The mass secession led to four years of civil war and the death of hundreds of thousands of people. The seceding states established their own government called the Confederate States of America and fought the U.S. military forces with their own army. When the Confederate forces were defeated in April 1865, the seceding states rejoined the United States.


U.S. Civil War.

See: desertion, expiration, lapse, relinquishment, resignation, revolt, schism
References in periodicals archive ?
Miscikowski said she voted against putting secession on the ballot ``on the grounds that I think a few more days or a week would give us enough time to do some fine-tuning.
Miscikowski, a secession opponent, said that because LAFCO Executive Officer Larry Calemine made several major revisions in his plan the day before, it left the commission little time to analyze them.
Miscikowski, who heads the City Council's secession committee, opposed the plan because, like Hahn, she believes it fails to protect the city of Los Angeles.
Secession has been a constant theme for Valley dissidents who felt ignored and disenfranchised by City Hall, and efforts were organized in the 1940s, 1960s and 1970s, but were killed either by changes in state law or promises of improved Los Angeles government.
LAFCO commissioner and county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky criticized the city for portraying the issue as a major obstacle, and said it seemed to be part of a strategy to defeat secession, rather than a legitimate concern.
Talking to the commission, secession supporter Richard Leyner, past chairman of the Valley's United Chambers of Commerce, referred to Hahn's comment that secession would be a mistake of ``biblical proportions.
If the city of Los Angeles goes forward with a referendum on secession, voters won't have time to request a study to see what the breakup would mean.