gain

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gain

noun accomplishment, accretion, accrual, achievement, advancement, amplification, appreciation, attainment, augmentation benefit, betterment, enlargement, expansion, growth, heightening, improvement, increase, increment, master, obtainment, procurement, profit, success, upturn, winning
Associated concepts: gain derived from capital, gain derived from profits, net gain

gain

verb accept, accomplish, achieve, acquire, adopt, advance, assume, attain, avail, bag, be better for, be improved by, benefit, capere, capture, cash in on, clear, collect, come by, come into, consequi, derive, draw, earn, extract, flourish, gather, get, get possession of, glean, grasp, harvest, improve, learn, lucrari, make, make a profit, make capital, make money, master, move forward, net, obtain, pick up, procure, profit, prosper, realize, reap, reap profits, reap rewards, reap the benefit of, receive, secure, succeed, take, thrive, turn to account, win, yield returns
Associated concepts: accrued gain, activity for gain, annual gain, business gain, capital gains, economic gain, gainful employment, long term capital gain, net gain, pecuniary gain, private gain, short term capital gain
Foreign phrases: Nemo debet aliena jactura locupletari.No one ought to gain by another's loss.
See also: accession, accretion, accrue, accumulate, acquire, acquisition, advancement, advantage, appreciation, attain, augmentation, bear, benefit, betterment, boom, carry, collect, development, dividend, earn, edification, enlarge, enlargement, expand, gather, headway, improvement, increase, increment, inherit, interest, inure, obtain, output, perquisite, possess, prize, proceeds, procure, profit, progress, prosperity, purchase, reach, realize, reap, receipt, receive, recruit, revenue, secure, shelter, succeed, yield

GAIN. The word is used as synonymous with profits. (q. v.) See Fruit.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is conscious deception for intentional secondary gain that warrants a malingering diagnosis.
The authors of the current paper contend that duration of reported symptoms does not necessarily imply the secondary gain of compensation associated with malingering.
If defense counsel cannot get your expert to admit the possibility of malingering, they may get him or her to admit the possibility of secondary gain, particularly where the plaintiff's symptoms persevere.
Thus, investigators should consider the possibility of MSBP if they believe there to be some secondary gain - in the form of attention or notoriety - afforded the offender at the expense of the victim.
However, if we have a full-scale pricing war coupled with depressed servicing values, a flatter yield curve and little secondary gains, the battlefield will be littered with casualties.
There would be no secondary gain and charts would be reviewed based on actual evidence-based medicine.
Some of the factors that would tend to increase the risks of living unrelated kidney donation are significant psychiatric symptoms or disorders; substance abuse or dependence; a lack of health insurance; a limited capacity to understand risks; motives reflecting a desire for recognition; a subordinate relationship to the patient, such as employee or employer; or an expectation of secondary gain.
Malingerers have a secondary gain as their motive, which may include such goals as money, drugs or medications, escape from police, etc.
In addition, traditional conceptualizations of clients with mild brain injury clients are those of exaggerated symptoms for secondary gain (i.
Of the non- responders, half were shown to have primary psychogenic (mental origin) pain disorders while the remainder had secondary gain factors.
Examples of secondary gain factors are numerous and include any family or financial problems that the employee may be having, the fact that in some states disability payments exceed an injured worker's regular wages, a fear -- for whatever reason -- of returning to work, and adversarial relationships between an injured employee and his or her employer.
In response to the decreased secondary gain, management increased loan fees, lowered commissions, closed unprofitable branches, obtained more favorable borrowing terms from warehouse lenders and reduced corporate expenses.