self-command


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His self-command is the most admirable worldly thing I have ever seen.
To the usual precocity of the girl, she added that early experience of struggle, of conflict between the inward impulse and outward fact, which is the lot of every imaginative and passionate nature; and the years since she hammered the nails into her wooden Fetish among the worm-eaten shelves of the attic had been filled with so eager a life in the triple world of Reality, Books, and Waking Dreams, that Maggie was strangely old for her years in everything except in her entire want of that prudence and self-command which were the qualities that made Tom manly in the midst of his intellectual boyishness.
Her self-command must have seemed simultaneously masculine and feminine at the time.
Early childhood education might usefully focus as much on enhancing self-command as on narrowly "cognitive" goals.
The empire of the self; self-command and political speech in Seneca and Petronius.
Only a minority of men possess enough self-command to stick to moral principles when most people would fall prone to the 'temptation to do otherwise' (VI.
64) In order to reach propriety, however, "benevolence" is not enough for human beings; thus Smith supplements his mentor's sole motive with the virtue of self-command.
But the novel does not simply endorse Elinor's self-command and hidden suffering or condemn Marianne's expressiveness.
While working on her thesis, Akerjordet developed two scales for evaluating her 250 respondents' emotional intelligence-aiming to map out their creativity, self-command, self-knowledge and social skills.
If so, moral judgment, which is totally based on the emotions, amounts to the exercise of self-command in that the agent restrains or commands his original emotion by far-sighted emotion.
Smith writes, "Our sensibility to the feelings of others, so far from being inconsistent with the manhood of self-command, is the very principle upon which that manhood is founded.
In short, they will exercise self-command, Smith's preeminent individual virtue.