self-effacing

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Related to self-effacement: self-aggrandizement, self-perpetuating, self-effacingly
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In this paper, Virtue ethics is defended against the charge of self-effacement.
In an admiring review of "Postwar," The New Yorker's Louis Menand noted that the book's strength was inseparable "from the personality of its author, who does not count self-effacement a literary virtue.
It would appear that Amstell's self-effacement is also, like his on-screen cockiness, an act.
The USA and the EU have called for self-effacement on all sides.
Four decades of television have also exposed his infectious sense of humour, sunny disposition, charming self-effacement and lack of self-importance.
Zizek holds that in the default of a big transcendental signifier to justify any claims we make, it is necessary simply to make up convincing narratives; moreover, Zizek implies that no other religion can account for our subjectivity and our corporeality in so convincing a manner as the one in which God suffered incarnation and then total self-effacement.
His winning smile and giggling shrugs suggest self-effacement, but the appearance is deceiving.
Fortunately, the fundamental dignity and self-effacement of those closely associated with the Grand National winner ensured the big moments were appropriately conveyed, but the overall editorial approach left a great deal to be desired - from the perspective of my sofa, at least.
In reply to the letter of resignation, the King hailed RifaiAAEs Aotrue national belonging, dedication and capacity to shoulder the trust and opt for achievement with wisdom, political shrewdness, self-effacement, altruism and decencyAo
In reply to the letter of resignation, the king hailed Rifai's "true national belonging, dedication and capacity to shoulder the trust and opt for achievement with wisdom, political shrewdness, self-effacement, altruism and decency.
The new Center for Academic and Spiritual Life promises to uphold and enhance that sense of modest self-effacement.
The built-in contradiction between traditional concepts of honor and Christianity has contributed to this change: bravery, pride, and combativeness on the one hand and self-effacement, humility, and peace on the other.