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Related to sequencing: DNA sequencing, Sanger sequencing
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These candidates are distributed across all the human chromosomes except for the Y-chromosome, and altogether represent > 2% of all known human genes (International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium 2004), Efforts for the EGP have also focused on completing SNP discovery across entire pathways of interacting genes, such as the base-excision repair pathway illustrated in Figure 1.
sidesteps a bottleneck in conventional gene sequencing.
Gaining this exclusive license is strategic for us as we broaden our strong intellectual property base and expertise to ensure that 454 Life Sciences maintains its leading position and creates barriers to entry in the whole genome sequencing arena," stated Richard F.
The FBI Laboratory uses positive and negative controls in mtDNA processing to monitor amplification and sequencing and does not proceed with the mtDNA analysis if these controls fail to meet established criteria.
Actually, the sequencing of the human genome hasn't been any of these things.
Sanger sequencing is considered to be the gold standard method for DNA analysis.
pestis after sequencing of 2 different targets (chromosome-borne rpob and plasmid-borne pla genes) in other specimens collected in other persons' remains (3).
In August 2004, NHGRI the mouse as announced that it has added 18 new model organisms to its sequencing pipeline, including the orangutan, the African savannah elephant, the rabbit, and the domestic cat.
The data and expertise that GeneSpectrum has accumulated in the areas of probe design and DNA hybridization will be invaluable to the sequencing platform that NABsys is pursuing," said Barrett Bready, M.
1, cycle sequencing kit, Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA).
The sequencing of multiple species' genomes by the Human Genome Project, including those of the human, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, has laid the foundation for the field of comparative genomics.
In the late 1980s, several scientists raised the provocative idea of sequencing all human genes as well as the even greater lengths of DNA in between--whose functions were, and still are, largely unknown.