sequester


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sequester

v. to keep separate or apart. In so-called "high-profile" criminal prosecutions (involving major crimes, events, or persons given wide publicity) the jury is sometimes "sequestered" in a hotel without access to news media, the general public or their families except under supervision, in order to prevent the jury from being "tainted" by information or opinions about the trial outside of the evidence in the courtroom. A witness may be sequestered from hearing the testimony of other witnesses, commonly called being "excluded," until after he/she has testified, supposedly to prevent that witness from being influenced by other evidence or tailoring his/her testimony to fit the stories of others. (See: sequestration)

sequester

(Seclude), verb cloister, closet, conceal, confine, exclude, isolate, quarantine, remove, retire, secret, segregate, separate, withdraw
Associated concepts: sequester a jury, sequester a witness

sequester

(Seize property), verb annex, appropriate, arrogate, attach, confiscate, dispossess, distrain, impound, impress, levy, preempt, replevy, separate, sequestrate, set apart, set aside, take, take hold of, wrest
Associated concepts: sequester assets
See also: attach, collect, confiscate, deprive, distrain, eliminate, exclude, garnish, impound, impress, insulate, isolate, remove, seclude, seize, withdraw

sequester

1 the practice, prevalent in the USA, of keeping juries sealed up during sensational trials. In this way they do not have access to prejudicial materials or contacts.
2 to take (property) temporarily out of the possession of its owner, until the claims of creditors are satisfied or a court order is complied with.
3 in international law, to requisition or appropriate enemy property.

TO SEQUESTER, civil and eccl. law. To renounce. Example, when a widow comes into court and disclaims having anything to do, or to intermeddle with her deceased husband's estate, she is said to sequester. Jacob, L. D. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sequester relief is desperately needed in the short-term.
Nineteen percent of college graduates believe the sequester has been good for the U.
The worst option of all, which has already been suggested by some lawmakers, he diplomatically noted, would be to replace the sequester in part or whole with higher income taxes.
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar says the sequester is responsible for an indefinite delay in reopening the Statue of Liberty after Hurricane Sandy (though as of this writing Liberty Island will re-open July 4 while Ellis Island will remain closed) and for undermining his ability to fight fires and clean up after storms.
Mr Agarwal predicts that local output will fall by over 3% this year, and some 30,000 jobs will be lost, if the sequester goes ahead.
A CBS News Poll conducted as the sequester cuts were about to begin found that 53 percent of Americans said that they personally will be affected by the cuts in sequester.
I hope that the current sequester would help to trim America's urge to go to war when such is either unnecessary or could be avoided, and bring some sanity back.
Geoengineering research on the ocean has focused mainly on boosting the natural biological pump in the ocean to sequester more carbon dioxide.
The announcement was delayed by preparations for the sequester.
Wilmers and Estes acknowledge that a spreading otter population won't solve the problem of higher CO2 in the atmosphere but argue that the restoration and protection of otters is an example how managing animal populations can affect ecosystems abilities to sequester carbon.
The project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide per day in a saline aquifer in a sandstone formation at a depth of about 7,000 feet.
A controversial investigation into the use of ocean fertilisation to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by boosting the growth of photosynthetic plankton has returned disappointing results.