sharpening

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References in classic literature ?
Why should they brighten their tomahawks and sharpen their knives against each other?
But would it not be desirable to try to exert an influence upon him, to try to quicken his moral life and sharpen his sense of duty?
Dan sluiced the pen energetically, unshipped the table, set it up to dry in the moonlight, ran the red knife-blades through a wad of oakum, and began to sharpen them on a tiny grindstone, as Harvey threw offal and backbones overboard under his direction.
As if the sight of the building, itself, would sharpen his memory, he turned north and drove past it.
He asked permission to clean and polish and sharpen them--a favour which was readily granted.
The original causes which dispose men to the things which I have mentioned are, taken in one manner, seven in number, in another they are more; two of which are the same with those that have been already mentioned: but influencing in a different manner; for profit and honour sharpen men against each other; not to get the possession of them for themselves (which was what I just now supposed), but when they see others, some justly, others [1302b] unjustly, engrossing them.
He was seized by the chief of this region, fastened to the foot of a baobab, and the ferocious black then severed all his joints while the war-song of his tribe was chanted; he then made a gash in the prisoner's neck, stopped to sharpen his knife, and fairly tore away the poor wretch's head before it had been cut from the body.
He thought it would be good for them to be thrown in contact with the Kentish lads, and it would sharpen the country wits of these.
I believe now that a man like you would murder anyone for money-- sharpen a razor and come up behind his best friend and cut his throat like a sheep--I've read of such people.
Well, he wrote so furiously that he broke his pencil, and had, as you observe, to sharpen it again.
They seem to keep a specially cutting east wind, waiting for me, when I go to bathe in the early morning; and they pick out all the three-cornered stones, and put them on the top, and they sharpen up the rocks and cover the points over with a bit of sand so that I can't see them, and they take the sea and put it two miles out, so that I have to huddle myself up in my arms and hop, shivering, through six inches of water.
This is an amusement to sharpen the intellect; it has a sting--it has what we call satire, and wit without indecency.