shuck

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What you need is an oyster or a shucking knife with a short blade.
There, perched on a chrome-legged stool at the counter, barely an hour after bounding off my plane, I downed a dozen plump beauties, deftly opened by Seattle native David Leck, a 31-year-old Taylor employee and international shucking champ.
We all wanted to be Dream Curly and wear the smart outfit and dance the big dance and never have to worry about shucking corn that's as high as an elephant's eye.
Pete Wilson stood in the doorway of the University of California with an axe handle and single-handedly turned back the clock to 1957, after shucking his pointy robe for a Republican cloth coat.
Sea Watch intends to convert the plant to a clam shucking facility by year's end.
Jim Dwyer is a screenwriter and producer, who together with partner Todd Verow, has produced the award winning features Little Shots of Happiness (Berlin, SXSW, Mill Valley '97), Shucking the Curve (NY Underground '98, No Dance '99) and The Trouble with Perpetual Deja Vu (NY and Chicago Underground '99, Vancouver International).
The requirements of a supply of fresh oysters, a shucking knife and glove, are simple enough--it's keeping the goop on the hook and casting that poses the greatest challenge.
Stuck with shucking the corn or shelling the peas, we know we're not getting fed for free.
TV, Boston's premiere online network that showcases unique and compelling video content recently sent cameras to The Boston International Seafood Show held at the Boston Convention Center to capture the first annual Oyster Shucking Competition.
Here the significantly named Lyman Felt, who lands in a hospital bed due to his reckless and possibly suicidal driving (of a Porsche, naturally), claims moral superiority to his peers because he married his second wife without shucking the first - although neither woman is aware of the bigamy.
But the high esteem in which Washington held Greenfield was more than just Machiavellian; as an editor, Greenfield really was capable of shucking respectability and embracing truly creative ideas, the best example being her decision to sign up Village Voice cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty to write "Washingtoon," a seemingly naive but in fact quite canny and subversive sendup of Washington politics that made an enormous hit in the 1980s.
While I was attempting to infiltrate the literary coterie and thus reestablish my East Coast interests, Maia was shucking off the past, embracing L.