single-minded


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Richard was a wonderful paradox, an egalitarian with Ego, a strong, single-minded leader with an almost pathological desire to consult, include and openly debate.
The single-minded focus on immediate profit is what drives socialist and collectivist illusions that, at times, lead to violence.
If you turn public schools, even the best ones, into single-minded test-prep factories where teachers drone on from scripted lessons and more people will want that magical voucher.
Unlike even the best mine-detecting dog or human, they are relentlessly single-minded.
She was born last July, along with 27 single-minded siblings.
admits that there are late redactional links between the first and last chapters of the book of Isaiah, he opposes the idea that Second Isaiah was written by a school of devotees to the Isaianic tradition and concludes that Second Isaiah's concern for the reconstruction of Jerusalem made a good fit with the single-minded concentration on the doomed fate of the city in chaps.
In the twilight of his career, Jackson knows he has to be single-minded and selfish if he is to remain a true competitor for the big titles.
But, speaking in the same chamber where her mother had so recently lain in state, it was only the first time our resilient and single-minded 76-year-old monarch had made her intentions so clear: She will not abdicate in favour of her son, Prince Charles.
However, if anyone can crack the secret code, bet on Nanin, with her single-minded, passionate commitment.
But more than one quarter (27 percent) said women's voices were muted when the "woman is overly militant, combative, single-minded, or insubordinate.
However, Tromly's single-minded approach tends to rob Marlowe of any impulse other than iconoclastic cruelty He rejects the possibility (indeed, likelihood) that Marlowe's cruelty is a means to an end somewhat more elevated than an impulse to "do dirt on humanity," as Wilbur Sanders once characterized the motivations of Edward II in a notoriously homophobic outburst.
In their new book, "The New Corporate Cultures," Deal and Kennedy argue that today's business leaders in their single-minded pursuit of shareholder interests have created employee distrust, skepticism and fear that have ripped apart once great corporate cultures.

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