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singular

adjective different, distinct, eccentric, eminent, especial, exceptional, exclusive, individual, isolated, lone, matchless, nonpareil, odd, out of the ordinary, particular, peculiar, peerless, queer, rare, remarkable, separate, single, singularis, sole, special, unaccompanied, uncommon, uncustomary, unexampled, unicus, unique, unparalleled, unusual
See also: certain, distinct, distinctive, eccentric, extraordinary, individual, infrequent, irregular, nonconforming, notable, noteworthy, novel, only, original, particular, peculiar, personal, portentous, private, prodigious, rare, remarkable, renowned, separate, several, sole, special, specific, unaccustomed, uncanny, uncommon, unilateral, unique, unprecedented, unusual

SINGULAR, construction. In grammar the singular is used to express only one, not plural. Johnson.
     2. In law, the singular frequently includes the plural. A bequest to "my nearest relation," for example, will be considered as a bequest to all the relations in the same degree, who are nearest to the testator. 1 Ves. sen. 337; 1 Bro. C. C. 293. A bequest made to "my heir," by a person who had three heirs, will be construed in the plural. 4 Russ. C. C. 384.
     3. The same rule obtains in the civil law: In usu juris frequenter uti nos singulari appellationie, am plura significari vellemus. Dig. 50, l6, 158.

References in classic literature ?
The reader may deem it singular that the head carpenter of the new edifice was no other than the son of the very man from whose dead gripe the property of the soil had been wrested.
It was only by an exertion of force that her mother brought her up to him, hanging back, and manifesting her reluctance by odd grimaces; of which, ever since her babyhood, she had possessed a singular variety, and could transform her mobile physiognomy into a series of different aspects, with a new mischief in them, each and all.
She laughed again, and even now when she had told me why, her laughter was very singular to me, for I could not doubt its being genuine, and yet it seemed too much for the occasion.
Following some such principle, I am inclined to regard the singular Castle of Coningsburgh I mean the Saxon part of it as a step in advance from the rude architecture, if it deserves the name, which must have been common to the Saxons as to other Northmen.
By the orders I have received," said the curate, "since Apollo has been Apollo, and the Muses have been Muses, and poets have been poets, so droll and absurd a book as this has never been written, and in its way it is the best and the most singular of all of this species that have as yet appeared, and he who has not read it may be sure he has never read what is delightful.
The effects of this singular attitude was to separate into two heavy masses the volume of her black hair, which now fell on either side of her head, and allowed the two spectators to admire the white shoulders glistening like daisies in a field, and the throat, the perfection of which allowed them to judge of the other beauties of her figure.
I have said that the sole effect of my somewhat childish experiment--that of looking down within the tarn--had been to deepen the first singular impression.
The black-faced man, howling in a singular voice rolled about under the feet of the dogs.
I will confess to you, Albert," replied Franz, "the count is a very singular person, and the appointment you have made to meet him in Paris fills me with a thousand apprehensions.
There is a certain church in the city of New York which I have always regarded with peculiar interest, on account of a marriage there solemnized, under very singular circumstances, in my grandmother's girlhood.
The uncharitable were apt to surmise that he had, in the interim, been well used up in a buffalo hunt; but those accustomed to Indian morality in the matter of horseflesh, considered it a singular evidence of honesty that he should be brought back at all.
In his account of the singular and interesting people among whom he was thrown, it will be observed that he chiefly treats of their more obvious peculiarities; and, in describing their customs, refrains in most cases from entering into explanations concerning their origin and purposes.