sleazy

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Related to sleaziness: not permanent
See: poor, tawdry
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What Stuart Taylor has called the "bum rap" has become the gospel truth among pundits and political correspondents, as an emblem of Gore's supposed sleaziness.
One answer, an answer one hears increasingly even in hip-hop circles, is that the line between sexiness and sleaziness is not always easy to see but that the celebrity or non-celebrity who crosses it harms herself and the industry.
And the sleaziness of their juvenile public feud over a comic strip character called "the Yellow Kid" spawned the infamous term "yellow journalism," which still lives today.
But there is a sleaziness in acting, rather than being, me.
Soares incorporates all elements of Brazilian society into this portrait of nineteenth-century Rio--the intellectual, artistic, and material sumptuousness of the court of Dom Pedro, the sleaziness of the poor neighborhoods, the busyness of the burgeoning bourgeoisie.
Clinton's presidency appears to have survived the disclosures of sexual sleaziness, his lying, and Kenneth Starr's hugely funded project to sink his presidency.
But a few cases are sufficient, particularly when accompanied by the recent growth of lobbying activity, to create a strong impression of sleaziness in politics.
He captures the sleaziness of media transfigurations that turn would-be Lolitas into has-beens overnight, the hurly-burly of the recording industry, the frenzy of a rock-star spectacle, the lascivious stages of a seduction scene.
So also was his graceless and stupid buckpassing when he blamed America's sexual sleaziness for priestly molestation, ignoring the real cause: the warped teachings of his own church against women and sex.
The concept of a grocery cart jammed with money - the story was subsequently confirmed at Kanemaru's trial - seemed to crystallize the pervasive sleaziness of Japanese politics.
The opium den of Dorian Gray yields nothing in sleaziness to the gin mill of l'Assommoir.