smack


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See: beat, strike
References in periodicals archive ?
Lorraine Taylor No problem with smacking a child - the problem is always the parent doing it - a smack correctly used teaches respect.
Phiten's accessories are worn by thousands of professional athletes worldwide to help them perform at a higher level," said Bill Sigler, CEO of Smack Sportswear.
I'm one of the people who thinks we do need to smack children, or use corporal punishment, for good reasons.
But the 2004 Children's Act states that, if a smack results in bruising, swelling, cuts or grazes, it is punishable with up to five years in jail.
These parents are scared to smack their children and paranoid that social workers will get involved and take their children away.
But mums and dads were told they could smack older kids, if it was "justifiable assault".
For a long time it was thought to be OK to smack children, then it became a matter of political correctness and now it's not.
Well there wouldn't have been a mark on the little boy above, as the smack was to the head not the face, and as for mental harm, how on earth is that measured to any satisfaction in a two-year-old toddler who can hardly express any thoughts and feelings coherently.
Married parents are twice as likely as single parents to smack their children while half of all mothers and fathers say they feel guilty after hitting their child.
And Labour's Pauline O'Neill, convenor of the Holyrood justice committee, said: "People are not bad parents because they smack their kids over the back of their hands.