rest

(redirected from soap)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Rest

To cease motion, exertion, or labor.

In a lawsuit, a party is said to "rest," or "rest her case," when that party indicates that she has produced all the evidence that she intends to offer at that stage and submits the case either finally, or subject to the right to offer rebutting evidence after her opponent has introduced her evidence.

rest

(Be supported by), verb couch, lay, lean, lie, lounge, perch, prop, recline, squat

rest

(Cease from action), verb abstain, be at ease, be peaceful, be quiet, be still, be tranquil, calm down, cease, come to a standstill, desist, discontinue, end, halt, idle, keep quiet, lounge, pause, recess, relax, repose, retire, settle, stand still, stay, stop, stop work, take a break, take time out, terminate

rest

(End a legal case), verb cease to litigate, complete prosecution, conclude proceeding, end the introduction of evidence, end the presentation of evidence, finish litigaaion, submit the case, terminate a trial
Associated concepts: rest a case
See also: abeyance, absence, cessation, complement, composure, deposit, desist, extension, furlough, halt, hiatus, holiday, inaction, inertia, interval, leave, lodge, lull, moratorium, pause, place, recess, release, relief, remain, remainder, remission, repose, reside, respite, stay, stop
References in classic literature ?
didn't use so much soap on his hands, he wouldn't always be late at breakfast.
There was a building to which the grease was piped, and made into soap and lard; and then there was a factory for making lard cans, and another for making soap boxes.
I was spared the trouble of answering, for Bessie seemed in too great a hurry to listen to explanations; she hauled me to the washstand, inflicted a merciless, but happily brief scrub on my face and hands with soap, water, and a coarse towel; disciplined my head with a bristly brush, denuded me of my pinafore, and then hurrying me to the top of the stairs, bid me go down directly, as I was wanted in the breakfast-room.
Nobody but I even did him the kindness to call him a dirty boy, and bid him wash himself, once a week; and children of his age seldom have a natural pleasure in soap and water.
A dark store-room opens out of it, and that is a place to be run past at night; for I don't know what may be among those tubs and jars and old tea-chests, when there is nobody in there with a dimly-burning light, letting a mouldy air come out of the door, in which there is the smell of soap, pickles, pepper, candles, and coffee, all at one whiff.
Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap.
This was the introduction to a great ceremony with soap and water, from which Baby came out in new beauty, and sat on Dolly's knee, handling her toes and chuckling and patting her palms together with an air of having made several discoveries about herself, which she communicated by alternate sounds of "gug-gug-gug", and "mammy".
Why, I once followed a man for ten miles on a dark night by the smell of the hot water he had used to shave with--for the poor fellow had no soap.
Then he was battered to and fro as a rat is shaken by a dog--to and fro on the floor, up and down, and around in great circles, but his eyes were red and he held on as the body cart-whipped over the floor, upsetting the tin dipper and the soap dish and the flesh brush, and banged against the tin side of the bath.
I will get soft soap, and monkey soap, and all sorts of soap; and soda and scrubbing brushes; and persian powder; and carbolic to remove the smell.
The one with the basin approached, and with arch composure and impudence, thrust it under Don Quixote's chin, who, wondering at such a ceremony, said never a word, supposing it to be the custom of that country to wash beards instead of hands; he therefore stretched his out as far as he could, and at the same instant the jug began to pour and the damsel with the soap rubbed his beard briskly, raising snow-flakes, for the soap lather was no less white, not only over the beard, but all over the face, and over the eyes of the submissive knight, so that they were perforce obliged to keep shut.
We are sufficiently civilized to carry our own combs and toothbrushes, but this thing of having to ring for soap every time we wash is new to us and not pleasant at all.