solace

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We have already given a picture of a free trapper and his horse, as furnished by Captain Bonneville: we shall here subjoin, as a companion picture, his description of a free trapper's wife, that the reader may have a correct idea of the kind of blessing the worthy hunter in question had invoked to solace him in the wilderness.
But it is not moved to seek seclusion, and to remain, hidden and inert, shut up in a small cabin with the solace of a good bodily appetite.
In such an event what a solace would a companion be?
The idea put an end to the transient solace they had enjoyed in the comparative repose and abundance of the river.
where grows Not even one lonely rose) -- My soul at least a solace hath In dreams of thee, and therein knows An Eden of bland repose.
In this state of intellectual and moral depravity, he found a solace in the renewal of his experiments with the mechanical powers of the kite.
The third are gratiosi, favorites; such as exceed not this scantling, to be solace to the sovereign, and harmless to the people.
He fancied that she nodded her comprehension; and with that scant solace he had to trudge off through the rain.
Philip, not knowing how many incompetent people have found solace in these false notes, was much impressed.
But he had deliberately incurred the hindrance, having made up his mind that it was now time for him to adorn his life with the graces of female companionship, to irradiate the gloom which fatigue was apt to hang over the intervals of studious labor with the play of female fancy, and to secure in this, his culminating age, the solace of female tendance for his declining years.
With his air of looking down on the highest, and confidentially inviting you to be of his company in the seat of the scorner he is irresistible; his very confession that he is a snob, too, is balm and solace to the reader who secretly admires the splendors he affects to despise.
But such illusions were usually dissipated, on coming out of church, by hearing his voice in jocund colloquy with some of the Melthams or Greens, or, perhaps, the Murrays themselves; probably laughing at his own sermon, and hoping that he had given the rascally people something to think about; perchance, exulting in the thought that old Betty Holmes would now lay aside the sinful indulgence of her pipe, which had been her daily solace for upwards of thirty years: that George Higgins would be frightened out of his Sabbath evening walks, and Thomas Jackson would be sorely troubled in his conscience, and shaken in his sure and certain hope of a joyful resurrection at the last day.