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special

adj. referring to a particular purpose, person or happening. In law these include hearings, proceedings, administrator, master, orders and so forth.

special

adjective amazing, astonishing, astounding, atypical, awe-inspiring, awesome, certain, conspicuous, different, distinctive, distinguished, endemic, esoteric, especial, exceptional, extraordinary, fantastic, gala, important, imposing, incredible, infrequent, marked, marvelous, memorable, miraculous, notable, noteworthy, outstanding, particular, praecipuus, prodigious, rare, remarkable, significant, specific, striking, stupendous, superior, unaccustomed, uncommon, uncustomary, unexampled, unfamiliar, unique, unparalleled, unprecedented, unusual, wonderful
Associated concepts: special act, special appearance, special assessment, special benefits, special case, special circummtances, special damages, special election, special interest, special law, special legislation, special proceeding, special remedy, special tax, special verdict
Foreign phrases: Statutum generaliter est intelligendum quando verba statuti sunt specialia, ratio autem generrlis.When the words of a statute are special, but the reaaon general, the statute is to be understood generally. Generalia praecedunt, specialia sequuntur. General matters precede, special matters follow.
See also: ad hoc, certain, considerable, distinct, distinctive, exclusive, extraordinary, individual, momentous, nonconforming, notable, noteworthy, outstanding, particular, peculiar, preferential, preferred, prominent, rare, remarkable, singular, specific, technical, uncommon, unique, unusual

DAMAGES, SPECIAL, torts. Special damages are such as are in fact sustained, and are not implied by law; these are either superadded to general damages, arising from an act injurious in itself, as when some particular loss arises. from the uttering of slanderous words, actionable in themselves, or are such as arise from an act indifferent and not actionable in itself, but injurious only in its consequences, as when the words become actionable only by reason of special damage ensuing. To constitute special damage the legal and natural consequence must arise from the tort, and not be a mere wrongful act of a third person, or a remote consequence. 1 Camp. 58; Ham. N. P. 40; 1 Chit. Pl. 385, 6.

DAMAGES, SPECIAL, pleading. As distinguished from the gist of the action, signify that special damage which is stated to result from the gist; as, if a plaintiff in an action of trespass for breaking his close, entering his house, and tossing his goods about, were to state that by means of the damage done to his house, he was obliged to seek lodging elsewhere.
     2. Sometimes the special damage is said to constitute the gist of the action itself; for example, in an action wherein the plaintiff declares for slanderous words, which of themselves are not a sufficient ground or foundation for the suit, if any particular damage result to the plaintiff from the speaking of them, that damage is properly said to be the gist of the action.
     3. But whether special damage be the gist of the action, or only collateral to it, it must be particularly stated in the declaration, as the plaintiff will not otherwise be permitted to go into evidence of it at the trial, because the defendant cannot also be prepared to answer it. Willes, 23. See Gist.

PLEADING, SPECIAL. By special pleading is meant the allegation of special or new matter, as distinguished from a direct denial of matter previously alleged on the opposite side. Gould on Pl. c. 1, s. 18.

SPECIAL. That which relates to a particular species or kind, opposed to general; as special verdict and general verdict; special imparlance and general imparlance; special jury, or one selected for a particular case, and general jury; special issue and general issue, &c.

References in classic literature ?
In Georgia there are none but common-law courts, and an appeal of course lies from the verdict of one jury to another, which is called a special jury, and for which a particular mode of appointment is marked out.
Close on the rear of this came a couple of cabs, the forerun- ners of a long procession of flying vehicles, going for the most part to Chalk Farm station, where the North-Western special trains were loading up, instead of coming down the gradient into Euston.
History repeats itself, but the special call of an art which has passed away is never reproduced.
I only asked, because I have in stock a very special one which I got lately from Nepaul.
At the chief entrance to the palace, however, an official came running out to meet him, and learning that he was a special messenger led him to another entrance.
He was [29] meant--we see it in the variety, the high level both of matter and style, the animation, the gravity, of one after another of these thoughts--on religion, on poetry, on politics in the highest sense; on their most abstract principles, and on the authors who have given them a personal colour; on the genius of those authors, as well as on their concrete works; on outlying isolated subjects, such as music, and special musical composers--he was meant, if people ever are meant for special lines of activity, for the best sort of criticism, the imaginative criticism; that criticism which is itself a kind of construction, or creation, as it penetrates, through the given literary or artistic product, into the mental and inner constitution of the producer, shaping his work.
In the first place," the station-master answered, "a special train to London would cost you a hundred and eighty pounds, and in the second place, even if you were willing to pay that sum, it would be at least two hours before I could start you off.
The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice.
Also, it very frequently got out special editions of from two to five millions.
The electric organs of fishes offer another case of special difficulty; it is impossible to conceive by what steps these wondrous organs have been produced; but, as Owen and others have remarked, their intimate structure closely resembles that of common muscle; and as it has lately been shown that Rays have an organ closely analogous to the electric apparatus, and yet do not, as Matteuchi asserts, discharge any electricity, we must own that we are far too ignorant to argue that no transition of any kind is possible.
50 a volume) is the largest and in most parts the most scholarly general work in the field, but is generally too technical except for special students.
I understand that you have ordered a special train to Harwich.