spike


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References in classic literature ?
After walking for about three hours the Prince came upon a dreary-looking grey stone wall; this was the back of the building and did not attract him; but when he came upon the front of the house he found it even less inviting, for the old witch had surrounded her dwelling with a fence of spikes, on every one of which a man's skull was stuck.
If you buy him, you'll be ringmaster, and you must never, never spike him.
Then, with a clap that shook the house to its foundation, it was thrown clean back, where it lay with its unsightly spikes pointing threateningly upward.
Miserrimus Dexter lifted one of the truffles tenderly on his spike, and held it up to me in a favorable light.
They were the spike and ornaments of an ancient German helmet.
There s one - it comes up like my hand - a long spike.
There is no spike of rusty iron in the air, between the eye and it, from any point of the real prospect.
Pesca' At the mention of myself I can hold no longer--the thought of you, my good dears, mounts like blood to my head--I start from my seat, as if a spike had grown up from the ground through the bottom of my chair--I address myself to the mighty merchant, and I say (English phrase) 'Dear sir, I have the man
1846; The Red Skins, 1846; The Crater (Marks Reef), 1847; Captain Spike, or the Islets of the Gulf, 1848; Jack Tier, or the Florida Reefs, 1848; The Oak Openings, or the Bee-Hunter, 1848; The Sea Lions,
Its movables were ugly old chairs with worn-out seats, and ugly old chairs without any seats; a threadbare patternless carpet, a maimed table, a crippled wardrobe, a lean set of fire-irons like the skeleton of a set deceased, a washing-stand that looked as if it had stood for ages in a hail of dirty soapsuds, and a bedstead with four bare atomies of posts, each terminating in a spike, as if for the dismal accommodation of lodgers who might prefer to impale themselves.
To their slaves they did not give either musket or fusee; but they had each a halberd, or a long staff, like a quarter-staff, with a great spike of iron fastened into each end of it, and by his side a hatchet; also every one of our men had a hatchet.
Not unlike an alligator in shape, with spikes on its head and tail, with a warty, squatty ridge-encrusted body, a big pouch beneath its chin, and long-toed claws, it was enough to strike terror into the heart of almost any one.