station


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Related to station: Underground station
See: appointment, base, building, caliber, character, class, condition, department, house, locality, locate, location, lodge, place, plant, plight, position, post, posture, prestige, quality, reputation, reside, seat, situation, stand, standpoint, state, status, structure, title, venue

STATION, civil law. A place where ships may ride in safety. Dig. 49, 12, 1, 13; id. 50, 15, 59.

References in classic literature ?
As the last foot touched the rock, the canoe whirled from its station, when the tall form of the scout was seen, for an instant, gliding above the waters, before it disappeared in the impenetrable darkness that rested on the bed of the river.
The Indians continued their hostilities; and, about the tenth of August following, two boys were taken from Major Hoy's station.
Since then I have seen many horses much alarmed and restive at the sight or sound of a steam engine; but thanks to my good master's care, I am as fearless at railway stations as in my own stable.
During their progress, needless to say, the sounds of the cello are pretty well extinguished; but at last the three are at the head, and Tamoszius takes his station at the right hand of the bride and begins to pour out his soul in melting strains.
John could now be hurried forward and forced into the position of head of the family several years sooner than had been anticipated, so Hannah's husband was obliged to exercise great self-control or he would have whistled while he was driving Rebecca to the Temperance station.
The rain seemed to be streaming down more heavily than ever and everybody in the station wore wet and glistening waterproofs.
The last is necessary to enable the people, when they see reason to approve of his conduct, to continue him in his station, in order to prolong the utility of his talents and virtues, and to secure to the government the advantage of permanency in a wise system of administration.
The cab stopped before the railway station at twenty minutes past eight.
Among these were a couple of cyclists, a jobbing gardener I employed sometimes, a girl carrying a baby, Gregg the butcher and his little boy, and two or three loafers and golf caddies who were accustomed to hang about the railway station.
Temple had, according to the custom of the new settlements, been selected to fill its highest judicial station.
Broken in heart and numbed, he had nothing to hurry for; but he wished to get out of a town which had been the scene of such an experience, and turned to walk to the first station onward, and let the train pick him up there.
It was a sombre snowy afternoon, and the gas-lamps were lit in the big reverberating station.