subject


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to subject: Subject and object

subject

(Conditional), adjective contingent, dependent on circumstances, depending upon, inciient to, incidental, provisional, relying upon, subiectus, subordinate, uncertain
Associated concepts: subject to approval, subject to defeaaance, subject to review

subject

(Exposed), adjective accountable, at the mercy of, chargeable, liable, open, prone, unexempt from, vulnerable

subject

(Object), noun case, experimentee, liegeman, recipient, testee, victim
Associated concepts: subject of an investigation

subject

(Topic), noun affair, argumentum, content, course, gist, issue, material, matter, motif, pith, point, point at issue, quaestio, study, text, theme, thesis
Associated concepts: interest in subject matter, subject of agreement, subject of bailment, subject of commerce, subbect of statute, subject of tax

subject

verb bring under domination, bring under rule, cause to undergo, conquer, control, crush, defeat, dominate, enslave, enthrall, expose, get the better of, govern, hold down, hold in bondage, hold in subbection, humble, keep down, make liable, make submissive, make subordinate, make subservient, master, obnoxium reddere, oppress, overcome, overmaster, overthrow, quell, repress, rule, subdue, subicere, subjugate, subordinate, suppress, tame, triumph over, vanquish, worst
See also: article, captive, compel, constrain, content, contents, dependent, dominate, inferior, issue, meaning, object, passive, question, require, servile, subdue, subjugate, subordinate, subservient, thesis

SUBJECT, contracts. The thing which is the object of an agreement. This term is used in the laws of Scotland.

SUBJECT, persons, government. An individual member of a nation, who is subject to the laws; this term is used in contradistinction to citizen, which is applied to the same individual when considering his political rights.
     2. In monarchical governments, by subject is meant one who owes permanent allegiance to the monarch. Vide Body politic; Greenl. Ev. Sec. 286; Phil. & Am. on Ev. 732, n. 1.

References in classic literature ?
Her "condition" was in no way apparent, and no one would have known a thing about it but for her persistence in making it the subject of conversation.
It was the subject of skeletons that brought this boy back to my recollection.
As the romance is imperfect, we are not acquainted how the discovery takes place; but it is probably much in the same manner as in other narratives turning on the same subject, where the host, apprehensive of death for having trespassed on the respect due to his Sovereign, while incognito, is agreeably surprised by receiving honours and reward.
There is a wide difference, also, between military establishments in a country seldom exposed by its situation to internal invasions, and in one which is often subject to them, and always apprehensive of them.
That we may form a juster estimate with regard to this interesting subject, let us resort to the actual dimensions of the Union.
By being 'present in a subject' I do not mean present as parts are present in a whole, but being incapable of existence apart from the said subject.
I thought I was under the ferule of my professor, and developing a subject of amplification.
The subject, in truth, she evidently found, was not so easy to handle.
But yet there is not any thing amongst civil affairs more subject to error, than the right valuation and true judgment concerning the power and forces of an estate.
A Chancery judge once had the kindness to inform me, as one of a company of some hundred and fifty men and women not labouring under any suspicions of lunacy, that the Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular prejudice (at which point I thought the judge's eye had a cast in my direction), was almost immaculate.
As to a happy life, whether it is to be found in pleasure or virtue or both, certain it is, that those whose morals are most pure, and whose understandings are best cultivated, will enjoy more of it, although their fortune is but moderate than those do who own an exuberance of wealth, are deficient in those; and this utility any one who reflects may easily convince himself of; for whatsoever is external has its boundary, as a machine, and whatsoever is useful in its excess is either necessarily hurtful, or at best useless to the possessor; but every good quality of the soul the higher it is in degree, so much the more useful it is, if it is permitted on this subject to use the word useful as well as noble.
When I became interested in the subject towards the end of the eighteen-seventies, Melville Bell was dead; but Alexander J.