subject


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to subject: Subject and object

subject

(Conditional), adjective contingent, dependent on circumstances, depending upon, inciient to, incidental, provisional, relying upon, subiectus, subordinate, uncertain
Associated concepts: subject to approval, subject to defeaaance, subject to review

subject

(Exposed), adjective accountable, at the mercy of, chargeable, liable, open, prone, unexempt from, vulnerable

subject

(Object), noun case, experimentee, liegeman, recipient, testee, victim
Associated concepts: subject of an investigation

subject

(Topic), noun affair, argumentum, content, course, gist, issue, material, matter, motif, pith, point, point at issue, quaestio, study, text, theme, thesis
Associated concepts: interest in subject matter, subject of agreement, subject of bailment, subject of commerce, subbect of statute, subject of tax

subject

verb bring under domination, bring under rule, cause to undergo, conquer, control, crush, defeat, dominate, enslave, enthrall, expose, get the better of, govern, hold down, hold in bondage, hold in subbection, humble, keep down, make liable, make submissive, make subordinate, make subservient, master, obnoxium reddere, oppress, overcome, overmaster, overthrow, quell, repress, rule, subdue, subicere, subjugate, subordinate, suppress, tame, triumph over, vanquish, worst
See also: article, captive, compel, constrain, content, contents, dependent, dominate, inferior, issue, meaning, object, passive, question, require, servile, subdue, subjugate, subordinate, subservient, thesis

SUBJECT, contracts. The thing which is the object of an agreement. This term is used in the laws of Scotland.

SUBJECT, persons, government. An individual member of a nation, who is subject to the laws; this term is used in contradistinction to citizen, which is applied to the same individual when considering his political rights.
     2. In monarchical governments, by subject is meant one who owes permanent allegiance to the monarch. Vide Body politic; Greenl. Ev. Sec. 286; Phil. & Am. on Ev. 732, n. 1.

References in classic literature ?
No man can be a competent legislator who does not add to an upright intention and a sound judgment a certain degree of knowledge of the subjects on which he is to legislate.
It is necessary, for exciting interest of any kind, that the subject assumed should be, as it were, translated into the manners, as well as the language, of the age we live in.
Our ancestors were not more distinct from us, surely, than Jews are from Christians; they had ``eyes, hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions;'' were ``fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer,'' as ourselves.
These, as well as all the more minute points of light and shadow, are attributes proper to scenery in general, natural to each situation, and subject to the artist's disposal, as his taste or pleasure may dictate.
The public are, in general, very ready to adopt the opinion, that he who has pleased them in one peculiar mode of composition, is, by means of that very talent, rendered incapable of venturing upon other subjects.
It may often happen on the stage, that an actor, by possessing in a preeminent degree the external qualities necessary to give effect to comedy, may be deprived of the right to aspire to tragic excellence; and in painting or literary composition, an artist or poet may be master exclusively of modes of thought, and powers of expression, which confine him to a single course of subjects.
Whether this reasoning be correct or otherwise, the present author felt, that, in confining himself to subjects purely Scottish, he was not only likely to weary out the indulgence of his readers, but also greatly to limit his own power of affording them pleasure.
If the author, who finds himself limited to a particular class of subjects, endeavours to sustain his reputation by striving to add a novelty of attraction to themes of the same character which have been formerly successful under his management, there are manifest reasons why, after a certain point, he is likely to fail.
Such annotations as may be useful to assist the reader in comprehending the characters of the Jew, the Templar, the Captain of the mercenaries, or Free Companions, as they were called, and others proper to the period, are added, but with a sparing hand, since sufficient information on these subjects is to be found in general history.
This, my dear friend, I have found the most difficult part of my task; and, to speak frankly, I hardly expect to satisfy your less partial judgment, and more extensive knowledge of such subjects, since I have hardly been able to please my own.
But there is no end to lamentation, when we betake ourselves to such subjects.
Such a poetry could not be permanently successful, because the subjects of which it treats -- if susceptible of poetic treatment at all -- were certainly not suited for epic treatment, where unity of action which will sustain interest, and to which each part should contribute, is absolutely necessary.