subjection


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Related to subjection: abiding, ailing, ascertain, seize

subjection

noun bondage, captivity, conquest, control, disenfranchisement, disfranchisement, duress, enslavement, enthrallment, force, helotry, inferior rank, innoluntary servitude, loss of freedom, officium, servitude, servitus, slavery, subdual, subjugation, submission, subserviency, thrall, yielding, yoke
See also: acquiescence, allegiance, bondage, captivity, compulsion, duress, force, homage, oppression, prostration, servitude, thrall

SUBJECTION. The obligation of one or more persons to act at the discretion, or according to the judgment and will of others.
     2. Subjection is either private or public. By the former is meant the subjection to the authority of private persons; as, of children to their parents, of apprentices to their masters, and the like. By the latter is understood the subjection to the authority of public persons. Rutherf. Inst. B. 2, c. 8.

References in periodicals archive ?
It seems clear, however, that even Kate's witty performance of subjection does not somehow free her from the gender hierarchies implicit in early modern marriage, and to some critics this is frustrating.
First, for almost all types of IA, it is possible to give a rule subjection analysis of the IA only as performed with a particular sentential vehicle.
So central was terror, violence, and servitude to 19th-century African American life, argues Hartman, there are ways in which even the most salient instances of black prerogative were also scenes of subjection.
Even so, as an instance of storytelling, Scenes of Subjection is fatally flawed.
The end of female subjection to men in marriage is a monumental move in church teaching.
Eschewing this form of depiction in her own analysis, Hartman focuses mainly on scenes of subjection in which "terror can hardly be discerned.
In political action, by contrast, increasing dependence necessarily becomes increasing subjection to the authority of others.
Here, woman is punished with subjection to man for breaking a prohibitory law.
The subjection on Prussia left its ally, Russia, still in the field.
Missing a 1099 obligation may prove fatal (Revenue Rule 81224), and the IRS asserts that protection is afforded to employers only for employment taxes; the worker may still be treated as an employee for other purposes, resulting perhaps in such things as disqualification of the company's retirement plan and the subjection of the worker to the 2% floor rule for deduction of unreimbursed business expenses (Revenue Procedure 85-18).
For LeConte, humans were mixtures of high and low instincts: "True virtue consists, not in the extirpation of the lower, but in its subjection to the higher.
Because so many of us haven't understood the rules, we have lost thousands upon thousands of square miles of real estate, millions of people have been brought under subjection by the enemy, and we have expended great material wealth in the struggle.