submission

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See: acquiescence, adhesion, allegiance, amenability, application, argument, assent, bid, capitulation, compliance, compromise, concession, conciliation, conformity, deference, discipline, homage, longanimity, loyalty, pleading, proposal, proposition, prostration, rendition, resignation, servitude, subjection, suggestion, thrall, tolerance

SUBMISSION. A yielding to authority. A citizen is bound to submit to the laws; a child to his parents; a servant to his master. A victor may enforce, the submission of his enemy.
     2. When a captor has taken a prize, and the vanquished have submitted to his authority, the property, as between the belligerents, has been transferred. When there is complete possession on one side, and submission upon the other, the capture is complete. 1 Gallis. R. 532.

SUBMISSION, contracts. An agreement by which persons who have a law suit or difference with one another, name arbitrators to decide the matter, and bind themselves reciprocally to perform what shall be arbitrated.
     2. The submission may be by the act of the parties simply, or through the medium of a court of law or equity. When it is made by the parties alone it may be in writing or not in writing. Kyd on Aw. 11; Caldw. on Arb. 16; 6 Watts' R. 357. When it is made through the medium of a court, it is made a matter of record by rule of court. The extent of the submission may be various, according to the pleasure of the parties; it may be of only one, or of all civil matters in dispute, but no criminal matter can be referred. It is usual to put in a time within which the arbitrators shall pronounce their award. Caldw. on Arb. ch. 3; Kyd on Awards, ch. 1; Civ. Code of Lo. tit. 19 3 Vin. Ab. 131; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 174; 6 Toull. n. 827; 8 Toull. n. 332; Merl. Repert. mot Compromis; 1 S. & R. 24; 5 S. & R. 51; 8 S. & R. 9; 1 Dall. 164; 6 Watts, R. 134; 7 Watts, R. 362; 6 Binn. 333, 422; 2 Miles, R, 169; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 2483, et seq.

References in classic literature ?
I know of no submission that IS proper for me to make.
The submission was made, and the court decided in favor of Pennsylvania.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
This gave him a high station in his own esteem, and thus contributed indirectly to his better behaviour; for he was scrupulous as well as high-spirited, and prided himself on nothing more than on a just submission.
When on the verge of submission to these opinions, the small duel had showed them that the propor- tions were not impossible, and by it they had revenged themselves upon their misgivings and upon the foe.
His officers affected a superiority over the rest of us, but the boredom of their souls appeared in their manner of dreary submission to the fads of their commander.
And yet this Reginald, whom a very few words from me softened at once into the utmost submission, and rendered more tractable, more attached, more devoted than ever, would have left me in the first angry swelling of his proud heart without deigning to seek an explanation.
That would render us a service, for when announcing to the king's lieutenant the submission of the islanders, you will perhaps obtain some grace for us on informing him of the manner in which that submission has been effected.
Simplicity is submission to the will of God; you cannot escape from Him.
Against certain facts he was helpless: against Will Ladislaw's existence, his defiant stay in the neighborhood of Lowick, and his flippant state of mind with regard to the possessors of authentic, well-stamped erudition: against Dorothea's nature, always taking on some new shape of ardent activity, and even in submission and silence covering fervid reasons which it was an irritation to think of: against certain notions and likings which had taken possession of her mind in relation to subjects that he could not possibly discuss with her.
As it was, he cowered down in a paralysis of fear, already half proffering the submission that his kind had proffered from the first time a wolf came in to sit by man's fire and be made warm.
To one imbued from infancy with the fascinating fallacy that all men are born equal, unquestioning submission to authority is not easily mastered, and the American volunteer soldier in his "green and salad days" is among the worst known.