subserve


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Because criminal laws in particular are intended to subserve the cause over several decades of generations.
As they all belong to one and the same circle of objects, they are one and all connected together; as they are but aspects of things, they are severally incomplete in their relation to the things themselves, though complete in their own idea and for their own respective purposes; on both accounts they at once need and subserve each other.
They studied the functional activity in neural circuits that subserve self-regulatory control in women with bulimia nervosa.
We've measured it in sensory areas of the brain but we hypothesize that the same kind of unreliability might be what's limiting the development of social and language abilities in the brain areas that subserve those functions.
I do believe that such Western insistence on retaining its primacy in world affairs will be increasingly challenged by "outsider" countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America, which will set up coalitions to challenge Western domination and subserve their own interests.
Insiders point out that the Act under which HZL was set up states that the output of the mines in Rajasthan will be exploited to " subserve the common good".
So the central and most intrinsically interesting kind of psychology is the kind that Vitz says turns out really to be philosophy, which the disciplines of neuroscience, cognitive science, and tests and measurements subserve.
One could postulate that increases in the structural and functional connectivity within brain regions that subserve behaviors of cognitive control would be beneficial in the controlled behaviors of some S/R practices.
Our correlation results also show an inverse relationship between activation and lifetime solvent exposure among the solvent-exposed subjects, supporting a direct relationship between exposure and blood flow in brain regions that subserve working memory as opposed to indirect compensatory or other cognitive effects.
Neither of these derive from nor subserve activities directed at a good life, but both are clearly rights.
Godey, in the January 1850 edition of Godey's Lady's Book, called his eponymous publication "a magazine of elegant literature" designed with the expressed aim "to subserve the best interests of Woman.