subsidy


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subsidy

noun allotment, allowance, backing, bounty, contribution, gift, grant, grant-in-aid, stipend, subsistence, subvention
Associated concepts: government subsidy
See also: aid, alimony, annuity, assistance, benefit, commission, consideration, contribution, donation, endowment, fee, grant, help, loan, maintenance, payment, pension, perquisite, recompense

SUBSIDY, Eng. law. An aid, tax or tribute granted by parliament to the king for the urgent occasions of the kingdom, to be levied on every subject of ability, according to the value of his lands or goods. Jacob's Law. Dict. h.t.
     2. The assistance given in money by one nation to another to enable it the better to carry on a war, when such nation does not join directly in the war, is called a subsidy. Vattel, liv. 3, Sec. 82. See Neutrality.

References in periodicals archive ?
Electricity subsidies constitute almost half of the energy subsidy bill, with heavy reliance on natural gas as a main resource for production.
Oman has ended subsidies on industrial gas use while Egypt has undertaken subsidy reform on advice from the IMF, to rein in spending.
Subsidy expenditures aggravate fiscal imbalances, and crowd out priority public spending and private investment, including in the energy sector.
While the fertiliser ministry has asked the finance ministry to clear the subsidy by the end of this fiscal, the carrying over of ` 40,000 crore forms part of the jugglery in numbers that is used in Budget.
He said bulk of the subsidy is misused by big farmers or swindled by fertilizer firms, according to the Planning Commission,
The Arab world has a high level of fuel subsidies, estimated at $250 billion a year, half the global fuel subsidy total.
But having a look at new prices, it seems they we are only 70 percent subsidy free, with 30 percent more to come
The subsidies could also hamper economic growth as the government directs its resources away from growth-enhancing spending towards paying subsidy costs.
Second, subsidies could also hamper economic growth as the government directs its resources away from growth-enhancing spending towards paying subsidy costs.
Electricity subsidy has increased fast in the past 10 years especially since 2005.
According to the IMF, which has been strongly lobbying for the removal of the subsidies, while poorer consumers are the main target of subsidy benefits, but in fact disproportionately end up going to the rich and middle classes.
I suggest that those receiving subsidies for these ghastly monstrosities should receive no other subsidy at all.