succession

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Succession

The transfer of title to property under the law of Descent and Distribution. The transfer of legal or official powers from an individual who formerly held them to another who undertakes current responsibilities to execute those powers.

succession

n. the statutory rules of inheritance of a dead person's estate when the property is not given by the terms of a will, also called laws of "descent and distribution." (See: descent and distribution, inheritance)

succession

noun chain, concatenation, consecutive order, continuatio, cycle, descent, family, issue, lineage, offspring, order, procession, progeny, progression, sequence, series, successorship, train
Associated concepts: hereditary succession, intestate succession, legal succession, line of succession, natural succession, successor employer, successor interest, testamentary succession
Foreign phrases: Haereditas est successio in universum jus quod defunctus habuerit.Inheritance is the succession to every right which the deceased had possessed. Haereditas nihil aliud est, quam successio in universum jus, quod defunctus habuerit. An inheritance is nothing other than the succession to all the rights which the deeeased had. Qui in jus dominiumve alterius succedit jure ejus uti debet. One who succeeds to the ownership rights of another, should enjoy the rights of the other. Non debeo melioris conditionis esse, quam auctor meus a quo jus in me transit. I ought not to be in better condition than he to whose rights I succeed.
See also: birth, bloodline, chain, continuity, cycle, devolution, frequency, hierarchy, lineage, sequence, subrogation

succession

following another, used in relation to the taking over of a body corporate including the Crown. Succession to the Crown is governed by law but can be upset by abdication. Technically, the area of law regulating the passing of property from a deceased person. See INTESTACY, TESTATE.

SUCCESSION, in Louisiana. The right and transmission of the rights an obligations of the deceased to his heirs. Succession signifies also the estate, rights and charges which a person leaves after his death, whether the property exceed the charges, or the charges exceed the property, or whether he has left only charges without property. The succession not only includes the rights and obligations of the deceased, as they exist at the time of his death, but all that has accrued thereto since the opening of the succession, as also of the new charges to which it becomes subject. Finally, succession signifies also that right by which the heir can take possession of the estate of the deceased, such as it may be.
     2. There are three sorts of successions, to wit: testamentary succession; legal succession; and, irregular succession. 1. Testamentary succession is that which results from the constitution of the heir, contained in a testament executed in the form prescribed by law. 2. Legal succession is that which is established in favor of the nearest relations of the deceased. 3. Irregular succession is that which is established by law in favor of certain persons or of the state in default of heirs either legal or instituted by testament. Civ. Code, art. 867-874.
     3. The lines of a regular succession are divided into three, which rank among themselves in the following order: 1. Descendants. 2. Ascendants. 3. Collaterals. See Descent. Vide Poth. Traite des Successions Ibid. Coutumes d'Orleans, tit. 17 Ayl. Pand. 348; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 1; Domat, h.t.; Merl. Repert. h.t.

SUCCESSION, com. law. The mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation aggregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bl. Com. 430.

References in periodicals archive ?
Pastures were then allowed to re-vegetate naturally with the goal that natural successional patterns would recreate the historic vegetation present in 1754 at the time of the French and Indian War battle, for which the battlefield was named.
Porfiriev, we identified types of successional systems that comprise the above communities, and described their relationship as a series of demutational successional changes.
Brown and Ewel (1987) found similar rates of herbivory in nine species when comparing a natural and an enriched successional site; however, because they did not assess communities of herbivores, they were not able to distinguish whether this was due to the herbivores or to other aspects shared between the sites.
These data were used to characterize current stand structure and composition and as a basis to predict future successional trends for the site.
s] increased significantly at 0-6 cm soil depth along four successional time series (pasture, secondary forest of 5-8 years, secondary forest of 12-15 years, secondary forest >100 years) in the humid tropics.
1979) attribute this decrease in forest floor organic matter to changes in leaf litter composition as early successional pines transitioned to deciduous hardwoods, altering the decomposition rate.
But at the second site, the team determined that "species performance" was the successional process dominating plant establishment and survival, since the native plants at the site were outnumbered by their invasive neighbors.
Based on all 20 species, 10 (50%) are considered early successional species by many authorities.
The Karner blue is an endangered species that inhabits early successional oak savanna and pine barrens ranging from New Hampshire to Wisconsin.
The responses of plants to the habitat conditions found along successional gradients are well known, but few data are available on responses of arthropods.
Success will be measured by the development of a stand consisting of mixed hardwoods and early successional forms of native vegetation that will provide good shelter, feeding and nesting resources for wildlife"
The floristic composition of swidden-land forests was characterized by a lack or low density of dipterocarps and the successional ascendance of pyrophytic tree species less vulnerable to felling and fire and with high sprouting capacity such as Schima wallichii, Vitex pinnata, Peronema canescens, and Vernonia arborea.