suffocate

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Which is probably just as well given the fact Moseley aren't yet guaranteed another year in the second tier and while they battle the Titans for elbow room on the suffocatingly tight Clifton Lane pitch, a more significant fixture will be taking place in the Channel Islands where bottom-placed Doncaster must beat Jersey.
Parents who believe themselves to be the archetypal Mother or Father (or both in the case of some single parents) too easily become abusively demanding, suffocatingly intrusive, or perhaps pathetically unable to set any limits on children running wild.
Mark (Andrew Scott) continues to find life in his home town suffocatingly parochial.
No doubt that is the point of "Drinking Companion:" To make the need for human connection, no matter how shallow, so suffocatingly desperate.
Bishop is renowned for her supposed diffidence and objectivity, but the poems of this group are, as Travisano witheringly notes, "almost wholly subjective, indeed, suffocatingly so.
This is how people Live--ordinary people whose only crime is having had the bad luck to be born into a totalitarian suzerainty so suffocatingly potent that children, asked what they want to do when they grow up, reply simply: "Leave.
It lacks a centre, sometimes even a focus as it tries to cram in too many incidents, episodes, scandals, controversies and plain absurdities that are an integral part of Bollywood, so much so that the first hour or so gets suffocatingly airtight.
Young people who were born, raised and educated in these suffocatingly prohibitive conditions, but who used their individual and collective endeavor and creativity to bring about this illuminating chapter of history in such an inspiring fashion is in itself an event to be highlighted.
For the 31-year-old Lebanese Robotics Engineering graduate, the suffocatingly rigid environment of corporate life at one of the largest multinational companies on earth was no way to earn a crust.
With strikers, wide-men and wingers more suffocatingly policed than ever, advancing full-backs are often the only players on the pitch to find themselves with space.
In modernity, if religion is admitted into the societal drawing room, it is consigned to an obscure corner, considered as belonging to the realm of the affective but cognitively empty, and, often enough, regarded as suffocatingly repressive and authoritarian.
A suffocatingly powerful read, Freedom anatomises a relationship and a nation in decline and their slender chances at redemption.