sue

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SUE

To initiate a lawsuit or continue a legal proceeding for the recovery of a right; to prosecute, assert a legal claim, or bring action against a particular party.

sue

verb appeal to the law, apply for, ask for relief, bring a legal action, bring an action, bring to justice, bring to the bar, claim, commence a suit, contest, entreat, file a legal claim, file suit, implore, initiate a civil action, inntitute a legal proceeding, institute process, legally pursue, litigate against, make appeal to, orare, petition, plead, preeer a claim, press a claim, pursue a claim, put on trial, seek by request, supplicate, take to court
Associated concepts: power to sue, right to sue, standing to sue
Foreign phrases: Nemo alieno nomine lege agere potest.No one can sue in the name of another.
See also: appeal, call, charge, claim, complain, demand, importune, litigate, prosecute

TO SUE. To prosecute or commence legal proceedings for the purpose of recovering a right.

References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of suing, the patient, a high-level federal official, ended up appreciating his straightforward approach, he says.
The suing party must in fact rely on the information.
I've never heard of a company suing an executive in the absence of a signed agreement or proof he leaked trade secrets,'' said Scott Landsbaum, a Beverly Hills attorney who specializes in toy industry law.
Also, some plaintiffs who have already received an asbestos settlement wind up also suing for silicosis, Behrens said.
The case is unique partly because it defies the usual tenor of disputes involving property owners and associations, which typically involve associations suing owners to enforce rules.
The Patient Protection Act allows individuals to sue their health plan while limiting damages and prohibiting the individual from suing the employer, unless the it was directly involved in making a medical decision.
That approach, however, was dealt a severe blow in March, when the family of a murdered Chicago policeman suing under that theory lost its case against a gun maker.
Proponents of Proposition 64 say unscrupulous attorneys are abusing the law by simply suing companies to generate a settlement.
It is ironic that these Fortune 500 high-tech companies are suing their property insurers for more than $1 billion to cover the cost of remediating Y2K problems in computer systems that they probably designed and programmed years ago.