suit


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Suit

A generic term, of comprehensive signification, referring to any proceeding by one person or persons against another or others in a court of law in which the plaintiff pursues the remedy that the law affords for the redress of an injury or the enforcement of a right, whether at law or in Equity.

suit

n. generic term for any filing of a complaint (or petition) asking for legal redress by judicial action, often called a "lawsuit." In common parlance a suit asking for a court order for action rather than a money judgment is often called a "petition," but technically it is a "suit in equity." (See: lawsuit)

suit

noun actio, action, action at law, action to serve justice, case, causa, cause, cause in court, judicial contest, lawsuit, legal action, legal proceeding, legal remedy, lis, petition, proceeding, suit in law, trial
Associated concepts: class suits, nonsuit, suit against state
Foreign phrases: Secta est pugna civilis; sicut actores arrantur actionibus, et, quasi, accinguntur gladiis, ita rei muniuntur exceptionibus, et defenduntur, quasi, clypeis.A suit is a civil battle; for as the plaintiffs are armed with actions, and, as it were, girded with swords, so the defendants are fortified with pleas, and are deeended, as it were, with shields. Frustra agit qui judiiium prosequi nequit cum effectu. He sues vainly who cannot prosecute his judgment with effect. Nemo alieno nomine lege agere potest. No one can sue in the name of another.
See also: accommodate, action, agree, appeal, calculate, call, case, cause, chain, claim, clothe, comply, comport, concur, conform, entreaty, fulfill, lawsuit, legal proceeding, matter, proceeding, prosecution, satisfy, trial

suit

a civil proceeding.

SUIT. An action. The word suit in the 25th section of the judiciary act of 1789, applies to any proceeding in a court of justice, in which the plaintiff pursues, in such court, the remedy which the law affords him. An application for a prohibition is therefore a suit. 2 Pet. 449. According to the code of practice of Louisiana, art. 96, a suit is a real, personal or mixed demand, made before a competent judge, by which the parties pray to obtain their rights, and a decision of their disputes. In that acceptation, the words suit, process and cause, are in that state almost synonymous. Vide Secta, and Steph. Pl. 427; 3 Bl. Com. 395; Gilb. C. P. 48; 1 Chit. Pl. 399; Wood's Civ. Law, b. 4, c. p. 315; 4 Mass. 263; 18 John. 14; 4 Watts, R. 154; 3 Story, Const. Sec. 1719. In its most extended sense, the word suit, includes not only a civil action, but also a criminal prosecution, as indictment, information, and a conviction by a magistrate. Ham. N. P. 270.

References in classic literature ?
By my faith, senor, hunting and amusements are more fit for idlers than for governors; what I intend to amuse myself with is playing all fours at Eastertime, and bowls on Sundays and holidays; for these huntings don't suit my condition or agree with my conscience.
I suppose you mean that I am to do my work for my wages; not to expect favour from you, and not to depend on you for any help but what I earn; that suits me exactly, and on these terms I will consent to be your clerk.
I can prepare for and put up with a regularly bad day, but these ha'porth-of-all-sorts kind of days do not suit me.
Well, then, I resolved, as at any time I might be invited to court to spend a week, I resolved to have always seven suits ready for the occasion.
It would be a little tight for your neck; something to lie down and hang would suit you better," she said, with some satisfaction.
Meanwhile, Dorothy had dressed herself in a pretty gown of soft grey embroidered with silver, and put a blue-and-gold suit of satin upon little Button-Bright, who looked as sweet as a cherub in it.
That will make a lovely suit," cried Polly, going on with the review.
The suit was of two peculiar shades of blue, so arranged that patches of light and dark distracted the eye.
I had to find food for two mouths beside my own and keep a roof over our heads--yes, and buy a winter suit, my one suit being decidedly summery.
A pessimist is one who never expects to find anything to suit him.
The snuff-coloured suit,' said Arthur Gride, surveying a threadbare coat.
Kings and queens who wear a suit but once, though made by some tailor or dressmaker to their majesties, cannot know the comfort of wearing a suit that fits.