sumptuary law


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sumptuary law

a law imposing restraint on luxury by limiting personal expenditure or by regulating personal conduct in religious and moral spheres.
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Ironically, what gets articulated by Greene and the Queen's Men in the professional theater's relatively unrestricted public space is a comment that like the antitheatricalist's own words suggests that the state's sumptuary law is a tool of moral reform, a function neither set out by the statutes nor definitively articulated by Elizabeth's recent proclamations.
A History of Sumptuary Law (London and New York, 1996), 26-33; Ribeiro, Dress and Morality, pp.
Kovesi Killerby, Sumptuary Law, 38; Vincent, Costume and Conduct, pp.
Lynn Laufenberg's Cornell University dissertation on the enforcement of sumptuary laws in fourteenth-century Florence will be a welcome addition.
The 1964 surgeon general's warning about the health consequences of cigarette smoking represented a sea change in political rhetoric that began justifying what some have called, perhaps inaptly, "modern sumptuary laws.
At the same time, discussions of burial practices have looked for evidence of codified sumptuary laws governing the grave goods.
It was common for earlier societies to implement sumptuary laws to
Scarlet letters and sumptuary laws are more commonly remembered today, but the local organization of charity and relief was probably a more important development in the sixteenth century.
Her themes are the evil of luxury, the Roman response to luxury, previous measures against extravagance, sumptuary laws, and sumptuary legislation in comparative perspective.
He begins with a discussion of sumptuary laws that linked dress and social status, arguing that challenges to these laws made way for the rise of fashion.
Sumptuary laws were enacted in many countries of Europe and around the world from the Middle Ages forward.