sumptuary law


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sumptuary law

a law imposing restraint on luxury by limiting personal expenditure or by regulating personal conduct in religious and moral spheres.
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A well-ordered society, it was believed, depended upon each member dutifully pursuing one's divinely ordained role, and since the fourteenth century English sumptuary laws had attempted to "regulate personal consumption, in particular of food, dress, and ornamentation" in order to sustain class stratification.
28) It was customary to dress lavishly when a traveler (Bernis 19-21), to the extent that a sumptuary law in 1625 forbade the use of gold and silver in cloth and decoration "aunque sean de camino" (quoted in Bernis 19).
Montijo argued that without serious changes in national practices and beliefs, sumptuary laws would remain ineffective.
Kent Roberts Greenfield, Sumptuary Law in Nurmberg: A Study in Paternal Government (Baltimore, 1918), pp.
Yet as Alan Hunt reminds us in his history of sumptuary laws, clothing, like other symbolic systems, can be manipulated by the individual and by groups both within and against prevailing ideologies and practices.
Lynn Laufenberg's Cornell University dissertation on the enforcement of sumptuary laws in fourteenth-century Florence will be a welcome addition.
Gujarat has a sumptuary law in force that proscribes the manufacture, storage, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
Gujarat has a sumptuary law in force since its formation in 1960 that proscribes the manufacture, storage, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
Similarly, perre in a sentence from the 1363 English Sumptuary Law surely, in this context, refers specifically to gemstones: "ne quils ne usent .
By the seventeenth century, the body of the child no longer represented a sexual and societal blank slate, but instead recreated the social order of the civic elites through aristocratic clothing that drew on sumptuary law to safely express social distinction, social aspiration, and legitimized local authority.
Such silence leads Alan Hunt to conclude, "The relative silence of the historical record about popular attitudes towards sumptuary law suggests that few people disliked the sumptuary restraints with the degree of strong feeling likely to have left a trace on the historical record.
No longer in the habit of reading The Federalist Papers, we learn our civics lessons in the gossip columns (boldfaced names ushered out of the limousines and into the VIP lounge, common names allowed to beg the favor of a food stamp or an autograph), and having lost faith during the years of our prosperity in any political or philosophical idea that might account for the unequal distributions of fortune, we revert to the simplicities of sumptuary law.