superseding cause

superseding cause

n. the same as an "intervening cause," or "supervening cause," which is an event which occurs after the initial act leading to an accident, and substantially causes the accident. The superseding cause relieves from responsibility (liability) the party whose act started the series of events which led to the accident, since the original negligence is no longer the proximate cause. (See: intervening cause, proximate cause)

superseding cause

noun annulment, break, immediate legal basis, immediate legal cause, immediate legal genesis, interceding break, nullification, obviation, ousting, overriding cause, overruling cause, preclusion, put in the place of, removal, replacement, succession, sufficient legal basis, sufficient legal cause, sufficient legal factor, sufficient legal genesis, suffiiient legel inducements, sufficient legal source, supplanttng legal cause, voidance
Associated concepts: intervening clause
References in periodicals archive ?
The surgeon's action may be deemed a factual, a concurring, or a superseding cause.
Because highly reckless conduct is necessarily unforeseeable and outrageous and, therefore, the cause of the accident, the defendant must "show that the highly reckless conduct was the sole or superseding cause of the injuries sustained.
The court went through, with specificity the circumstances wherein in a motor vehicular homicide case, an intervening cause is considered a superseding cause if it satisfies four elements: 1) Its harmful effects must have occurred after the original negligence; 2) It must not have been brought about by the original negligence; 3) It must have actively worked to bring about a result which would not otherwise have followed from the original negligence; and 4) it must not have been reasonably foreseeable by the original wrongdoer.
2] As the Third District Court itself put it in an earlier regime: "It is well-established that if the reasonable possibility of the intervention, criminal or otherwise, of a third party is the avoidable risk of harm which itself causes one to be deemed negligent, the occurrence of that very conduct cannot be a superseding cause of a subsequent misadventure.
The court said that even if the firm had negligently failed to see the return was filed on time, Kox's subsequent negligence in taking the full QTIP election, after he had left the firm, was the superseding cause of the trust's damages.
To establish a superseding cause, it must be shown that the criminal act was not reasonably foreseeable, it was highly extraordinary, and the conduct of the third party wa also highly extraordinary.
In both cases, the courts reached the conclusion that the video game and movie defendants owed no duty to the plaintiffs, the intangible ideas in movies and video games are not products, and the criminal acts of the shooters were the superseding cause of the deaths.
Superseding cause is "an act of a third person or other force which by its intervention prevents the actor from being liable for harm to another which his antecedent negligence is a substantial factor in bringing about" (Re statement [Second] of Torts [section]440).
14 /PRNewswire/ -- A unanimous Connecticut Supreme Court ruling this week brought to a close a lengthy product liability case that changed the long-standing Connecticut law of superseding cause and has directly resulted in the manufacture of a safer building product.
The trial court improperly determined that the hospital's negligence was a superseding cause of the patient's death.
The questions that primarily determined the court's resolution of the case were first, whether the parents' voluntary act of conception, although aware of an increased risk of harm to a child born of the pregnancy, was a superseding cause which relieved the physician of liability, and second, whether communication of an adequate warning of the increased risk of harm by the negligent physician or by others limits the physician's liability.