supervise

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It focuses on developing integration skills in students and trainees through Christian or integrative clinical supervision in five major aspects or areas of integration: presuppositional, theoretical, intervention, therapeutic relationship, and personal (Gingrich & Worthington, 2007).
The literature on the integration of Christian faith or Christian spirituality and clinical supervision has been limited or sparse, but recently some significant contributions have been made in a special issue of the Journal of Psychology and Christian clinical supervision edited by Jamie D.
The crucial role of clinical supervision in learning therapy skills (e.
The need to pay more attention to spirituality and religion in clinical supervision in general has been emphasized in recent years in the literature on clinical supervision (e.
It is important and appropriate therefore to focus on the crucial role of clinical supervision in developing integration skills in students and trainees The present article reviews several models for conducting integrative or Christian clinical supervision, with a focus on developing integration skills in students and trainees in five major aspects of areas of integration: presuppositional, theoretical, intervention, therapeutic relationship, and personal (Gingrich & Worthington, 2007,p.
Students can learn integration skills (see also Stevenson, Eck, & Hill, 20070 through methods such as classroom instruction or coursework, online instruction, reading and writing research, mentoring by professors or teachers, conferences, personal therapy and modeling by therapists, peer learning, and clinical supervision including mentoring by clinical supervisors in what Johnson (2007) has called transformational supervision.
Strategies are presented for helping mental health counseling (MHC) students navigate the process of receiving clinical supervision, from preparing for and initiating supervision to participating actively within and between sessions.
Within the field of counseling and psychotherapy, clinical supervision has only recently been recognized as a specialty in its own right (Bernard & Goodyear, 1998).
Berger & Buchholz, 1993; Bernard, 1994) have emphasized the importance of preparing mental health counseling (MHC) students to receive supervision and have provided suggestions for such preparation.
The purpose of this manuscript is to empower MHC students, who are entering their first practicum, by providing information and practical strategies for embracing the possibilities and avoiding the pitfalls of receiving supervision, that is, for getting the most out of their clinical supervision experiences.
Self-assessment of one's interest in and motivation for receiving supervision is a logical first step in preparing for the supervision experience.
Berger & Buchholz, 1993; Rodenhauser, Rudisill, & Painter, 1989) have maintained that qualities conducive to the successful use of supervision cannot be separated from qualities necessary to become an effective MHC.

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