surcease


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Related to surcease: vacillate, palaver, languish, impugn
References in classic literature ?
The good stands for all things that bring easement and satisfaction and surcease from pain.
More than anything else in the world, my frayed and frazzled mind wanted surcease from weariness in the way it knew surcease would come.
Not, as I now know, that our company was distasteful to him, but because his trouble had so grown that he could not respond to our happiness nor find surcease with us.
To this he will add three scenes later a shocking disregard for divine retribution in the lines "if the assassination / Could trammel up the consequence, and catch / With his surcease success; that but this blow / Might be the be-all and the end-all here, / But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, / We'Id jump the life to come" (1.
If the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success: that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all--here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come.
I will not do't, Lest I surcease to honour mine own truth And by my body's action teach my mind A most inherent baseness.
The Islamic Republic said loudly and without surcease that the United States had created IS as an American tool to allow the Americans to justify their military return to the region to dominate it--though how it planned to do that with no "boots on the ground" was never explained.
I will not do't Lest I surcease to honour my own truth, And by my body's action teach my mind A most inherent baseness.
The final act of her life, her decision to drown in waves she so often painted as surcease, may be viewed as both a testament to her courage and to her lack of it in the face of the coming horror of a world war.
As he correctly prophesied at the age of nineteen, the passion for human improvement he had imbibed as a child would only surcease in the silence of the tomb.
71) For Jacob Burckhardt, Constantine was "essentially unreligious" but was "driven without surcease by ambition and lust for power.
3:11, 30; 5:31; 8:28), is often explained as referring to a surcease of foreign domination and war.