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Related to sweetener: stevia, Artificial sweetener
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We wanted to study this population because these sweeteners frequently are recommended to them as a way to make their diets healthier by limiting calorie intake," Pepino said.
BioVittoria s chief executive David Thorrold says the company is delighted that after extensive consumer testing, McNeil chose monk fruit extract for its new natural table-top sweetener.
We first consider a tax imposed on sweetener inputs at the production level in food processing.
The article suggests that the body processes HFCS differently than other nutritive sweeteners and is a unique contributor to obesity.
Artificial Sweeteners & Fat Replacers (published 12/98, 198 pages) is available for $3300 from The Freedonia Group, Inc.
It's become the sweetener of choice and is in everything from Diet Coke and Light Dannon Yogurt to Swiss Miss Fat Free Hot Cocoa Mix and BreathSavers.
It is also the major ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, the table-top sweetener in the familiar pink packets, which, like all foods that contain saccharin, carries a congressionally mandated warning label that might be removed should saccharin ever lose its classification as a suspected carcinogen.
The sugar and sweetener industry has been growing on the back of factors like, growing number of diabetic patients worldwide, expanding obese population, mounting cardiovascular diseases incidences, and increasing consumption by the food and beverages industry.
7, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The goal of this report is to provide an up-to-date analysis of recent developments and current trends in the global non-sugar sweeteners market and to identify significant drivers of revenue growth in specific categories.
Particularly natural plant-derived sweeteners such as stevia are becoming popular as more people look for natural products.
The new sweetener derives its natural sweetness from the monk fruit, a small green melon that has been cultivated in Asia for hundreds of years.