take


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take

v. to gain or obtain possession, including the receipt of a legacy from an estate, getting title to real property, or stealing an object.

take

(Acquire), verb adopt, attach, carry, derive, excise, gain, get, impound, impress, obtain, preempt, procure, profit, reap, secure, sequester
Associated concepts: take effect, take over

take

(Deceive), verb betray, cheat, cozen, defraud, dupe, fool, gull, lead astray, mislead, victimize

take

(Seize), verb apprehend, appropriate, arrogate, capture, confiscate, embezzle, extort, grab, hijack, loot, pilfer, plunder, purloin, usurp
Associated concepts: burglary, grand larceny, grand theft, larceny, take a case from the jury, trespassing

take

(Understand), verb adopt, catch on, estimate, get the meaning of, grasp the meaning, hold as, set down as account as, take for, view as
See also: acquire, adopt, apprehend, appropriate, arrest, attach, carry, confiscate, derive, despoil, endure, excise, gain, hijack, impound, impress, inherit, loot, obtain, partake, pilfer, plunder, preempt, procure, profit, purloin, reap, receive, secure, seize, sequester, spoils, suffer, transport, trust, usurp

TAKE. This is a technical expression which signifies to be entitled to; as, a devisee will take under the will. To take also signifies to seize, as to take and carry away.

References in classic literature ?
So I'll comfort myself with that, and when I'm ready, I'll up again and take another.
In about six weeks or two months from now, there'll be one sailing - I see her this morning - went aboard - and we shall take our passage in her.
You're a shilly-shally fellow: you take after your poor mother.
When dinner was done, my master went out to his labourers, and, as I could discover by his voice and gesture, gave his wife strict charge to take care of me.
I pardon you on her intercession, and on the conditions that you take the beautiful Persian for your wife, and not your slave, that you never sell her, nor put her away.
It is not that," replied Don Quixote, "but because the sage whose duty it will be to write the history of my achievements must have thought it proper that I should take some distinctive name as all knights of yore did; one being 'He of the Burning Sword,' another
She appeared to take a great interest in him, asked him whence he came, who were his friends, and whether he had not sometimes thought of attaching himself to the cardinal.
Look here, Cyclops,' said I, you have been eating a great deal of man's flesh, so take this and drink some wine, that you may see what kind of liquor we had on board my ship.
In this way you have enemies in all those whom you have injured in seizing that principality, and you are not able to keep those friends who put you there because of your not being able to satisfy them in the way they expected, and you cannot take strong measures against them, feeling bound to them.
On going from lodge to lodge to visit his comrades, he takes it with him.
Now, therefore, let us all do as I say and sail back to our own country, for we shall not take Troy.
The preposterous obstinacy of these honest people in persisting to groan and stumble along the difficult pathway rather than take advantage of modern improvements, excited great mirth among our wiser brotherhood.