ship

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SHIP. This word, in its most enlarged sense, signifies a vessel employed in navigation; for example, the terms the ship's papers, the ship's husband, shipwreck, and the like, are employed whether the vessel referred to be a brig, a sloop, or a three-masted vessel.
     2. In a more confined sense, it means such a vessel with three masts 4 Wash. C. C. Rep. 530; Wesk. Inst. h.t. p. 514 the boats and rigging; 2 Marsh. Ins. 727 together with the anchors, masts, cables, pullies, and such like objects, are considered as part of the ship. Pard. n. 599; Dig. 22, 2, 44.
     3. The capacity of a ship is ascertained by its tonnage, or the space which may be occupied by its cargo. Vide Story's Laws U. S. Index, h.t.; Gordon's Dig. h.t.; Abbott on Ship. Index, h.t.; Park. Ins. Index, h.t.; Phil. Ev. Index, h.t. Bac. Ab. Merchant, N; 3 Kent, Com. 93 Molloy, Jure Mar. Index, h.t.; l Chit. Pr. 91; Whart. Dig. h.t.; 1 Bell's Com. 496, 624; and see General Ships; Names of Ships.

References in periodicals archive ?
Then there's the cost of taking ships out of service for a few weeks and putting them into dry dock so the hangers-on can be scraped off or dislodged with high-pressure jets of water; and the cost of preventive measures that enable ships to get by with a scraping every two years, rather than every few months.
A $5bn project to double the Panama Canal's capacity by building a third chain of locks across the isthmus is nearing completion, but it will still be restricted to taking ships of 65,000 tons or less.
But, because we're doing this, we're taking ships out of the order of battle.