tautology

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tautology

noun battology, duplication, loquacity, pleonasm, profuseness, redundancy, repetition, surfeit, verbiage, verbosity
See also: redundancy
References in periodicals archive ?
Since blind thought leads only to tautologies, and tautologies ultimately prove impotent to resolve disputes, is there any remaining reason to hope that language may be used as a tool serving pacific purposes?
start, to avoid tautologies, it can't be a number used to generate
It shows that all tautologies among the terms with exactly one N[N]-repetitions are simple.
B, like the implications introduced above, are not tautologies for [right arrow].
Literati who regard tautologies as errors belong to the former camp; logicians, for whom tautologies have a neutral character, have taken the latter position.
Johnson writes, the NAS resorts to repetitive false affirmations, disguised tautologies, authoritative obfuscations, baiting and switching, and smearing apostate Christian lipstick on its atheist pig-all in order to mislead and manipulate its audience.
More precisely we consider the standard fragment {[right arrow], [disjunction], [perpendicular to]} of this logic and compute the proportion of tautologies among all formulas.
I'm not talking about tautologies such as "It is always wrong to be cruel to children.
This is true not only of B-sentences ("The Battle of Waterloo is later than the Battle of Hastings" translates as "Presentness inheres, and will always inhere, in the Battle of Waterloo's being later than the Battle of Hastings"), but also of empirical generalizations and tautologies (chap.
Within the language of propositional formulae built on implication and a finite number of variables k, we analyze the set of formulae which are classical tautologies but not intuitionistic (we call such formulae - Peirce's formulae).
His is a philosophical humor that relies on tautologies and clashing contrasts, inspired equally by Duchamp and Wittgenstein.
But this is the only known equation that's an anagram--excluding redundancies like ELEVEN + TWENTY-TWO = TWELVE + TWENTYONE and tautologies like FOURTEEN + SIX = SIXTEEN + FOUR.