tear

(redirected from teary)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since this was Weatherly's last episode, DiNozzo shared teary goodbyes with all members of the team 6 Bishop (Emily Wickersham), Abby (Pauley Perrette), McGee (Sean Murray), Ducky (David McCallum), Vance (Rocky Carroll) Palmer (Brian Dietzen) 6 and even got a hug from Gibbs.
The teary reunion saw Keisha make the first move, approaching her former pals backstage.
I've been an actor for 36 years and this is the first prize I've ever won,'' said a teary Barraza, who's also on a panel called ``Creative Forces: Women in the Biz'' at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival on Saturday.
I donOt know if it was my imagination, but my breast tenderness disappeared overnight, I had more energy and I felt much less grumpy, teary and emotional.
TWS, which apparently stands for The World of Seniors, had another teary award show of some sort at the prestigious Henry Fonda Memorial Theatre.
Or it is, but it's just teenage heaviness, like Chris's teary explanation for Rob's mysterious disappearance: "I kept telling myself there had to be some kind of logical answer .
There were more moving speeches, teary acceptances and a few long-winded honorees.
Readers will be both appalled and fascinated by the teary scene in the Oval Office when Meyers succeeded in winning a stay of execution from the President.
However, he has a special place in Kylie's heart even now and she gets all teary eyed when she talks about him.
If Jen knew about Brad's teary eyes she certainly didn't show it, dancing and partying the night away with co-stars from her upcoming film Derailed.
I'll remember Platte, during teary goodbyes suddenly laughing, "Hey--you'd think we were going to prison
Yet--maybe because I could feel m yself literally growing old during the six-hour screening--I bristled at its pretentious appropriation of Mozart's music and short, tragic life (recounted by a teary narrator) as an allegory of human suffering, and its grandiose Dostoevskian declamations.