temperateness


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Henry is an author-surrogate in whom the qualities for which Bennett formerly most admired himself--balance, temperateness, punctilious organization, and a fine physical sensitivity to emotional experience--are exaggerated to reveal a latent monstrosity" (149-50).
Nor is "civility" an adequate synonym, in the familiar usage equating civility "with decorum, with temperateness of speech, with politeness and a high-minded determination not to descend from principles to personalities.
In 1824, after the Frenchman's triumphant return to the United States and during the goodwill tour that followed, in front of 300 misty-eyed spectators on the lawn of Monticello, he and Jefferson hobbled toward each other and embraced, two revolutionaries of sufficient temperateness to survive youth and linger into old age.
These tendencies naturally accompany the temperateness of words which characterizes them.