tenure

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Tenure

A right, term, or mode of holding or occupying something of value for a period of time.

In feudal law, the principal mode or system by which a person held land from a superior in exchange for the rendition of service and loyalty to the grantor.

The status given to an educator who has satisfactorily completed teaching for a trial period and is, therefore, protected against summary dismissal by the employer.

A length of time during which an individual has a right to occupy a public or private office.

In a general sense, the term tenure describes the length of time that a person holds a job, position, or something of value. In the context of academic employment, tenure refers to a faculty appointment for an indefinite period of time. When an academic institution gives tenure to an educator, it gives up the right to terminate that person without good cause.

In medieval England, tenure referred to the prevailing system of land ownership and land possession. Under the tenure system, a landholder, called a tenant, held land at the will of a lord, who gave the tenant possession of the land in exchange for a good or service provided by the tenant. The various types of arrangements between the tenant and lord were called tenures. The most common tenures provided for military service, agricultural work, economic tribute, or religious duties in exchange for land.

Cross-references

Feudalism.

tenure

n. 1) in real property, the right to possess the property. 2) in employment contracts, particularly of public employees like school teachers or professors, a guaranteed right to a job (barring substantial inability to perform or some wrongful act) once a probationary period has passed.

tenure

noun duration, holding, occupancy, period, possessio, possidere, regime, term
Associated concepts: tenure in office
Foreign phrases: Tenura est pactio contra communem feudi naturam ac rationem, in contractu interposita.Tenure is a compact contrary to the common nature and reason of the fee, put into a contract.
See also: domain, duration, enjoyment, occupancy, occupation, ownership, period, phase, possession, right, seisin, tenancy, term, time, title, use

tenure

the holding or occupying of property, especially realty, in return for services rendered, etc. See, for example FEUDAL SYSTEM.

TENURE, estates. The manner in which lands or tenements are holden.
     2. According to the English law, all lands are held mediately or immediately from the king, as lord paramount and supreme proprietor of all the lands in the kingdom. Co. Litt. 1 b, 65 a; 2 Bl. Com. 105.
     3. The idea of tenure; pervades, to a considerable degree, the law of real property in the several states; the title to land is essentially allodial, and every tenant in fee simple has an absolute and perfect title, yet in technical language, his estate is called an estate in fee simple, and the tenure free and common socage. 3 Kent, Com. 289, 290. In the states formed out of the North Western Territory, it seems that the doctrine of tenures is not in force, and that real estate is owned by an absolute and allodial title. This is owing to the wise provisions on this subject contained in the celebrated ordinance of 1787. Am. Jur. No. 21, p. 94, 5. In New York, 1 Rev. St. 718; Pennsylvania, 5 Rawle, R. 112; Connecticut, 1 Rev. L. 348 and Michigan, Mich. L. 393, feudal tenures have been abolished, and lands are held by allodial titles. South Carolina has adopted the statute, 12 C. II., c. 24, which established in England the tenure of free and common socage. 1 Brev. Dig. 136. Vide Wright on Tenures; Bro. h.t.; Treatises of Feuds and Tenures by Knight's service; 20 Vin Ab. 201; Com. Dig. h.t.; Bac. Ab. h. Thom. Co. Litt. Index, h.t.; Sulliv. Lect. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Over the years, UTSA--a Hispanic-serving institution--has increasingly been pushing its tenure-track faculty to crank out academic books and publish in peer-reviewed journals, according to officials.
Tenure-track faculty supervise students seeking advanced degrees.
Observed sex differences have their roots long before application to tenure-track jobs, starting in adolescence and amplified in high school--where fewer females take advanced placement courses in calculus and physics--and in college.
According to the American Association of University Professors, 70 percent of faculty at all colleges and universities are now adjuncts and 30 percent are tenured or tenure-track.
Of the eighty-one current non-clinical tenure-track members of the Harvard Law School faculty who have their initial law degree from an American law school, seventy-one received that degree from either Harvard or Yale.
I am one of those grad students who originally planned--and continues to plan--a career in a tenure-track position.
However, there were three barriers to the implementation of the new workload plan: a) an inability of tenured, tenure-track, and term (or non-tenure-track) faculty members to see and appreciate each other's responsibilities, b) the pressures of a complex organization that make equity difficult, and c) the realities of the faculty shortage, leading to a need to increase workloads.
In science-related university departments, women hold 36 percent of adjunct and temporary faculty positions, but only 28 percent of tenure-track and 16 percent of full professor positions.
Tenure-track positions at universities have been drying up in the wake of the economic downturn.
What difference, if any, does the human resources category (staff, tenure-track or non tenure-track faculty) make to an individual's work practices?
and who then choose to join the professoriate and go through the tenure-track process.
As for the professorship, Cook said it was an honor bestowed exclusively upon tenure-track professors.