term


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to term: term insurance, term paper, Term life insurance

Term

An expression, word, or phrase that has a fixed and known meaning in a particular art, science, or profession. A specified period of time.

The term of a court is the legally prescribed period for which it may be in session. Although the session of the court is the time that it actually sits, the words term and session are frequently used interchangeably.

In reference to a lease, a term is the period granted during which the lessee is entitled to occupy the rented premises. It does not include the period of time between the creation of the lease and the entry of the tenant. Similarly when used in reference to estates, the term is the period of time for which an estate is granted. An estate for five years, for example, is one with a five-year term.

A term of office is the time during which an official who has been appointed or elected may hold the office, perform its functions, and partake of its emoluments and privileges.

term

n. 1) in contracts or leases, a period of time, such as five years, in which a contract or lease is in force. 2) in contracts, a specified condition or proviso. 3) a period for which a court sits or a legislature is in session. 4) a word or phrase for something, as "tenancy" is one term for "occupancy."

term

(Duration), noun age, course, era, incumbency, interval, lifetime, period, reign, season, session, span, spatium temporis, spell, stage, tenancy, tenure, time
Associated concepts: term for years, term insurance, term of a lease, term of confinement, term of court, term of office
Foreign phrases: Terminus annorum certus debet esse et determinatus.A term of years ought to be certain and determinate.

term

(Expression), noun appellation, appellative, denomination, designation, epithet, heading, idiom, locution, name, phrase, title, verbalism, verbum, vocable, vocabulum, word
Associated concepts: definition of terms

term

(Provision), noun agreement, arrangement, artiile of agreement, bargain, clause, condicio, condition, covenant, item, lex, limitation, particular, point, proviso, qualification, specification, stipulation, understanding
Associated concepts: terms and conditions of a contract, terms of a policy, terms of payment, terms of sale
See also: call, clause, condition, define, denominate, denomination, division, duration, expiration, finality, identify, label, life, lifetime, option, period, phase, phrase, provision, purview, qualification, session, technicality, tenure, time, title

RULE, TERM, English practice. A term rule is in the nature of a day rule, by which a prisoner is enabled by the terms of one rule, instead of a daily rule, to quit the prison or its rules for the purpose of transacting his business. lt is obtained in the same manner as a day rule. See Rules.

TERM, construction. Word; expression speech.
     2. Terms or words are characters by which we announce our sentiments, and make known to others things with which we are acquainted. These must be properly construed or interpreted in order to understand the parties using them. Vide Construction; Interpretation; Word.

TERM, contracts. This word is used in the civil, law to denote the space of time granted to the debtor for discharging his obligation; there are express terms resulting from the positive stipulations of the agreement; as, where one undertakes to pay a certain sum on a certain day and also terms which tacitly result from the nature of the things which are the object of the engagement, or from the place where the act is agreed to be done. For instance, if a builder engage to construct a house for me, I must allow a reasonable time for fulfilling his engagement.
     2. A term is either of right or of grace; when it makes part of the agreement and is expressly or tacitly included in it, it is of right when it is not part of the agreement, it is of grace; as if it is not afterwards granted by the judge at the requisition of the debtor. Poth. on Oblig. P. 2, c. 3, art. 3; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 719 et seq.

TERM, estates. The limitation of an estate, as a term for years, for life, and the like. The word term does not merely signify the time specified in the lease, but the estate also and interest that passes by that lease; and therefore the term may expire during the continuance of the time, as by surrender, forfeiture and the like. 2 Bl. Com. 145; 8 Pick. R. 339.
     TERM, practice. The space of time during which a court holds a session; sometimes the term is a monthly, at others it is a quarterly period, according to the constitution of the court.
     2. The whole term is considered as but one day so that the judges may at any time during the term, revise their judgments. In the computation of the term all adjournments are to be included. 9 Watts, R. 200. Courts are presumed to know judicially when their terms are required to be held by public law. 4 Dev. R. 427. See, 1 generally, Peck, R. 82; 6 Yerg. R. 395; 7 Yerg. R. 365; 6 Rand. R. 704; 2 Cowen, R. 445; 1 Cowen, R. 58; 5 Binn. R. 389; 4 S. & R. 507 5 Mass. R. 195, 435.

References in classic literature ?
The warriors appeared to be on the most friendly terms, and seemingly conversed much together; yet, according to the account of the interpreter, each was absolutely ignorant of what the other said.
Later, he had engaged in politics, and served a part of two terms in Congress, besides making a considerable figure in both branches of the State legislature.
This requires about four hundred and eighty or five hundred duelists a year--for in summer the college term is about three and a half months, and in winter it is four months and sometimes longer.
Ca- pable of high attainments as an intellectual and moral being--needing nothing but a comparatively small amount of cultivation to make him an orna- ment to society and a blessing to his race--by the law of the land, by the voice of the people, by the terms of the slave code, he was only a piece of property, a beast of burden, a chattel personal, nevertheless!
Meantime, let him be assured, that I hold him not as one of his companions, with whom I can with pleasure exchange courtesies; but rather as one with whom I stand upon terms of mortal defiance.
Had the argument from the British example been truly stated, it would have stood thus: The term for which supplies may be appropriated to the army establishment, though unlimited by the British Constitution, has nevertheless, in practice, been limited by parliamentary discretion to a single year.
The term "Landfall" is more easily understood; you fall in with the land, and it is a matter of a quick eye and of a clear atmosphere.
They are generally Canadians by birth, and of French descent, who have been employed for a term of years by some fur company, but, their term being expired, continue to hunt and trap on their own account, trading with the company like the Indians.
Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons.
Men create oppositions, which are not; and put them into new terms, so fixed, as whereas the meaning ought to govern the term, the term in effect governeth the meaning.
At the beginning of the Christmas term which followed on his confirmation Philip found himself moved into another study.
For this purpose, they divided the term of his life between them, and each endowed one portion of it with the qualities which chiefly characterized himself.