terms


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References in classic literature ?
The terms of article eighth are still more identical: "All charges of war and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defense or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in Congress, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury," etc.
When the last day of term came he and Rose arranged by which train they should come back, so that they might meet at the station and have tea in the town before returning to school.
Lady Lydiard had, not long since, sent to ask her former steward to visit her; regretting, in her warm-hearted way, the terms on which they had separated, and wishing to atone for the harsh language that had escaped her at their parting interview.
And some honest and great clerks have been with me, and desired me to write the most curious terms that I could find.
Many of them express relations of terms to which nothing exactly or nothing at all in rerum natura corresponds.
Still, I said, let us have a more precise statement of terms, lest we should hereafter fall out by the way.
Perception also, as we saw, can only be defined in terms of perspectives.
Your answer as to whether you will undertake to conduct the case, and on what terms, you will be so good as to communicate to me.
He proposed the following terms, as the only terms on which he would consent to mix himself up with, what was (even in HIS line of business) a doubtful and dangerous transaction.
Here the Professor waved the memorandum of terms over his head, and ended his long and voluble narrative with his shrill Italian parody on an English cheer.
1788 he was stimulated by some new insanity to write and publish an injurious pamphlet, reflecting on the Queen of France, in very violent terms.
Then at once you confess yourself desirous to come to terms, do you Boffin?