criticism

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Related to textual criticism: form criticism

criticism

noun abuse, accusation, admonition, adverse comment, analysis, animadversion, aspersion, blame, carping, caviling, censure, charge, chiding, commentary, complaining, complaint, condemnation, contravention, critical examination, critical remarks, critique, denunciation, deprecation, derogation, detraction, disapproval, discommendation, disdain, disparagement, dispraise, disvaluation, exception, fault-finding, grievance, grumbling, imputation, indictment, insinuation, iudicium, lecture, objection, obloquy, odium, opposition, opprobrium, protestation, reflection, remonstrance, reprehension, reprimand, reproach, review, revilement, scolding, upbraiding
Associated concepts: fair and honest criticism, freedom of speech, privileged criticism
See also: bad repute, blame, complaint, condemnation, culpability, denunciation, diatribe, disapprobation, disapproval, discredit, disparagement, exception, grievance, ground, guidance, impeachment, impugnation, objection, obloquy, odium, ostracism, outcry, protest, rebuff, remonstrance, report, reprimand, review, revilement, stricture

CRITICISM. The art of judging skillfully of the merits or beauties, defects or faults of a literary or scientific performance, or of a production of art; when the criticism is reduced to writing, the writing itself is called a criticism.
     2. Liberty of criticism must be allowed, or there would be neither purity of taste nor of morals. Fair discussion, is essentially necessary to, the truth of history and advancement of science. That publication therefore, is not a libel, which has for its object, not to injure the reputation of an individual, but to correct misrepresentations of facts, to refute sophistical reasoning, to expose a vicious taste for literature, or to censure what is hostile to morality. Campb. R. 351-2. As every man who publishes a book commits himself to the judgment of the public, any one may comment on his performance. If the commentator does not step aside from the work, or introduce fiction for the purpose of condemnation, he exercises a fair and legitimate right. And the critic does a good service to the public who writes down any vapid or useless publication such as ought never to have appeared; and, although the author may suffer a loss from it, the law does not consider such loss an injury; because it is a loss which the party ought to sustain. It is the loss of fame and profit, to which he was never entitled. 1 Campb. R. 358, n. See 1 Esp. N. P. Cas. 28; 2 Stark. Cas. 73; 4 Bing. N. S. 92; S. C. 3 Scott, 340;. 1 M. & M. 44; 1 M. & M. 187; Cooke on Def. 52.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since his purpose is to show students how to engage in textual criticism, he suggests, where possible, more than one solution of a particular textual problem.
The commonly made distinction between literary and textual criticism is not therefore for him such a clear-cut one since the latter may reveal recensional layers of value for progress in the former.
It is the stated goal of textual criticism to locate-in the unlikely event it still survives intact-or to re-establish, if it does not, this original text.
The objective of textual criticism is often thought to be the reconstruction of a single lost original text from a multiplicity of variants.
He spells out his own method of textual criticism and reviews the "rules" of textual criticism, which, it turns out, are of limited use.
Music Philology: An Introduction to Musical Textual Criticism, Hermeneutics, and Editorial Techniques" is a precious monograph on musical textual criticism and editorial techniques aimed primarily at instrumental, not vocal music.
In The Struggle for Shakespeare's Text: Twentieth-Century Editorial Theory and Practice, Gabriel Egan has carved out a valuable track through the tangled forest of Shakespearean textual criticism.
Indeed, Stump's first chapter could be used as a companion to standard accounts of textual criticism as it goes through all the past century's established critical models of a book's material genesis and provides an innovative new take on the subject.
To David Butterfield he was a scholar whose 'primary sphere of excellence was the textual criticism of classical Latin poetry'.
Sally Bushell's Text as Process: Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson is a ground-breaking work that establishes the basis for an Anglo-American "genetic criticism," drawing on the insights of French critique genetique while reorienting that approach to bring it into dialogue with some of the primary emphases of Anglophone textual criticism.
By the century's end, with a keener interest in Shakespeare's language and textual criticism, the distance between stage and page became more distinct, leading to confusion on the nature of Garrick's process.
On the menu are literary criticism, folklore studies, textual criticism, source criticism, form criticism, tradition criticism, narrative criticism, structural criticism, rhetorical criticism, reader-response criticism, canonical criticism, and ideological criticism (including feminist criticism).