Marshalsea

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Marshalsea

historically a court held before the knight marshal, abolished 1849.

MARSHALSEA, English law. The name of a prison belonging to the court of the king's bench.

References in periodicals archive ?
Near the beginning of the novel, for example, when the narrator describes Amy's history as the Child of the Marshalsea, he openly includes both the reader and himself in a "we" that seems to refer to Amy's true audience:
With a pitiful and plaintive look for everything indeed, but with something in it only for him that was like protection, this Child of the Marshalsea and child of the Father of the Marshalsea, sat by her friend the turnkey in the lodge, kept the family room, or wandered about the prison-yard, for the first eight years of her life.
The fact that, during his period of disgrace, Manny's office of the serjeant of the marshalsea was granted to the king's cook may also be indicative of Edward III's state of mind.
He turned his fellow heralds against each other and took inappropriate and excessive profits from drawing pedigrees; he was committed to the Marshalsea for tricking Segar into granting arms to the common hangman of London.
51) A list of inmates at the Marshalsea Prison has been preserved because they happened to petition the Privy Council on 19 December 1589, but Gans is not among them either.
No hint of Roman stolas or togas in this sculptural group; the Marshalsea will not permit it, and the scheme has been all but camouflaged by the context in which it is native and endued.
Amid the varieties of nature the child of the Marshalsea and Camden Town came differently prepared than the child of the quiet rural vicarage.
Nothing impelled his connection of a female rescue with revolution aside from the image of prison-breaking itself -- admittedly a powerful image since the Tolbooth, like the Bastille and later the Marshalsea in Dickens's Little Dorrit, stood for an old order and no longer stands.
He could be in the Marshalsea now, facing mutilation or hanging.
But money troubles mean less than nothing to Amy when she learns that Arthur lies gravely ill in the Marshalsea debtors' prison, and she leaves her sister and brother to look after him.
His quest to solve the mystery of his father's dying words ("Put it right, Arthur") and discover what lies behind his mother's uncharacteristic act of charileads him to the Marshalsea prison for debt, where Amy lives with her father William (Courtenay).
Which of Charles Dickens's heroines grew up in the Marshalsea Prison?