thoroughfare


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See: causeway

THOROUGHFARE. A street or way so open that one can go through and get out of it without returning. It differs from a cul de sac, (q.v.) which is open only at one end.
     2. Whether a street which is not a thoroughfare is a highway, seems not fully settled. See 1 Campb. 260; 5 Taunt. 137; 11 East, 376, n.; Hawk. P. C. B. 1, c. 76, s. 1; 5 Barn. & Ald. 456. See Dedication.

References in classic literature ?
In the scattered situations where shops appear, those shops are not besieged by the crowds of more populous thoroughfares.
This is one of those miserable thoroughfares which intervene between the Rue Richelieu and the Rue St.
This latter is one of the principal thoroughfares of the city, and had been very much crowded during the whole day.
This is the street," said he, as we turned into a short thoroughfare lined with plain two-storied brick houses.
There are offices about the Inns of Court in which a man might be cool, if any coolness were worth purchasing at such a price in dullness; but the little thoroughfares immediately outside those retirements seem to blaze.
Everywhere you go, in any direction, you find either a hard, smooth, level thoroughfare, just sprinkled with black lava sand, and bordered with little gutters neatly paved with small smooth pebbles, or compactly paved ones like Broadway.
He directed the air-fleet to move in column over the route of this thoroughfare, dropping bombs, the Vaterland leading.
As he moved with the throng in the parklike canyon of the thoroughfare the life of an awakening Martian city was in evidence about him.
No sooner had the truth flashed upon me than the realization came that I must seek some other means of reaching the village, for to pass unobserved through this well-traveled thoroughfare would be impossible.
The houses were practically all two-storied structures, the upper stories flush with the street while the walls of the first story were set back some ten feet, a series of simple columns and arches supporting the front of the second story and forming an arcade on either side of the narrow thoroughfare.
The ape-man wheeled about and followed the other into the ill-lit alley, which custom had dignified with the title of thoroughfare.
Hundreds of natives left in their track were sawing down palm-trees, cutting away the bush, digging and making ready everywhere for that straight, wide thoroughfare which was to lead from Bekwando village to the sea-coast.