caution

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caution

(Vigilance), noun attention, attentiveness, care, carefulness, cautio, circumspection, concern, consideration, cura, diligence, exactitude, forethought, guardedness, heed, heedfulness, meticulousness, mindfulness, prudence, prudentia, regard, thoroughness, wariness, watchfulness
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution

caution

(Warning), noun admonition, alarm, alert, augury, caveat, exhortation, foreboding, foretelling, monition, notice, omen, portent, precursor, presage, prognosis, prognostic
Associated concepts: cautionary instructions

caution

verb admonish, advise against, apprise, be vigilant, communicate to, counsel, dissuade, exhort, exhort to take heed, forearm, foreshow, forewarn, give advice, give fair warning, give intimation of impending evil, give notice, give warning, give warning of possible harm, inform, make aware, monere, notify of danger, persuade against, predict, prenotify, prepare for the worst, prescribe, prewarn, put on guard, remonstrate, serve notice, sound the alarm, spell danger, take precautions, urge, warn
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution, unusual caution
Foreign phrases: Abundans cautela non nocet.Extreme caution does no harm.
See also: admonish, admonition, advise, alert, care, castigate, caveat, charge, counsel, deliberation, deter, deterrent, diligence, discourage, discretion, dissuade, exhort, expostulate, forewarn, heed, hesitation, indicant, inform, monition, notice, notification, notify, portend, precaution, premonition, prudence, restraint, signify, warn, warning

caution

1 a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence.
2 a warning to a person by the police, or in Scotland by the Procurator Fiscal, that while it is considered that there is enough evidence for a prosecution, no such prosecution will take place but that the matter will be kept on file.
3 a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of land without a notice to the person who entered the caution.
4 see GUARANTEE.

CAUTION. A term of the Roman civil law, which is used in various senses. It signifies, sometimes, security, or security promised. Generally every writing is called cautio, a caution by which any object is provided for. Vicat, ad verb. In the common law a distinction is made between a contract and the security. The contract may be good and the security void. The contract may be divisible, and the security entire and indivisible. 2 Burr, 1082. The securities or cautions judicially required of the defendant, are, judicio sisti, to attend and appear during the pendency of the suit; de rato, to confirm the acts of his attorney or proctor; judicium solvi, to pay the sum adjudged against him. Coop. Just. 647; Hall's Admiralty Practice, 12; 2 Brown, Civ. Law, 356.

CAUTION, TURATORY, Scotch law. Juratory caution is that which a suspender swears is the best he can offer in order to obtain a suspension. Where the suspender cannot, from his low or suspected circumstances, procure unquestionable security, juratory caution is admitted. Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 3, 6.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Northampton boss said: "We had to work hard but any side losing in the FA Cup will throw caution to the wind.
The goal saw Dunaghy throw caution to the wind in an effort to get something from the game.
And Manchester United striker Rooney, who played just behind the two main strike partners, believes England should throw caution to the wind and blow away Azerbaijan by going all out for victory.
STIRLING Mortlock last night admitted that the Wallabies expect Scotland to throw caution to the wind by launching a Sydney offensive.
Eriksson will throw caution to the wind and pick Chelsea midfielder Lampard ahead of Nicky Butt in a midfield diamond with Steven Gerrard, David Beckham and Paul Scholes against France on Sunday week.
They will both be feeling very guilty and Frank may throw caution to the wind.
Dr Derek Freedman, an expert in STDs, said: "People on holidays tend to throw caution to the wind and are not as careful as they should be.
I have decided, however, to throw caution to the winds and proceed with my all-cream-cake regime.
Synopsis: A middle-aged married couple throw caution to the winds to help the ecologically stressed planet.
And when the next set of blizzards descend on North Wales, be it this winter or next, will they heed police warnings to keep off the roads or will they throw caution to the winds and end up stranded in a snowdrift, for fear of losing pay?
And if you are not prepared to throw caution to the winds, eating more than you have ever eaten before, it is not the place for you.
In the name of speed, we throw caution to the winds and forget sentence patterning, paragraphing and other conventions that make messages intelligible, creating unattractive and impenetrable data dumps.