torquere

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Torquere can mean to twist or to wrench, even to torture.
After disagreeing with Jerome's reading of bonum, Erasmus, employing the verb torquere again, indicates that Jerome "somewhat distorts these things" because he is determined to win an argument, "especially since he thinks that it makes a great difference whether someone should be taught or defeated, enlightened (initiandus) or entrapped.
The word "queer" itself means across - it comes from the Indo-European root -twerkw, which also yields the German quer (traverse), Latin torquere (to twist), English athwart" (xii).
com)-- Every year, the authors at Torquere Press come together to write for a reason.
Her articles appear in GLQ and Torquere, and she is a coeditor of ReCalling Early Canada.
Torquere Press is celebrating their 10-year anniversary in September with giveaways, special releases, and more.
com)-- Torquere Press is celebrating their 11-year anniversary this month with giveaways, special releases, contests, and more.
The word 'queer' itself means across--it comes from the Indo-European root-twerkw, which also yields the German quer (transverse), Latin torquere (to twist), English athwart .
Quite apt, but an even more apt coincidence is the fact that torquere is Latin for "to torture"!
As Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick has pointed out, etymologically queer names a movement "across": "it comes from the Indo-European root -twerkw, which also yields the German quer (transverse), Latin torquere (to twist), [and] English athwart" (xii).
Her short fiction has appeared in Wascana Review, torquere, Frontiers, Her Circle, and EnterText.
Usage Note -- Although tortuous and torturous both come from the Latin word torquere, 'to twist,' their primary meanings are distinct.